Archives for architecture

Joy of Living Charity Auction For Maggie’s Centres Opens

THIS SEPTEMBER, Charity Project Joy of Living returns to One Poultry, City of London. Uniting over 100 designers, architects and artists, whose work is to be sold to raise funds for Maggie’s Centres. The charity helps people to cope with the impact of a cancer diagnosis, to continue to live in hope and with determination and to find a life beyond cancer.

The third event for the charity, held by design author and long-time supporter of Maggie’s, Max Fraser hopes to raise more than £80,000 for the charity, stating “after a very personal, emotional journey as I supported my mother through her six-year battle with cancer, I vowed to contribute in some way to mankind’s fight against this disease”.

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Emerging and established designers have been asked to create and donate one-off pieces, expressing the joy of living. Using only three pieces of differently coloured paper supplied by G.F Smith from their Colourplan range.

A number of talented, creative individuals have donated their artworks including designers: Jasper Morrison, Fredrikson Stallard, Barber & Osgerby, Tom Dixon, Ross Lovegrove, Eley Kishimoto and Ilse Crawford, works by architects: John Pawson, Ivan Harbour and Steven Holl, jewellery designers: Hannah Martin and Jade Jagger and pieces from artists Daniel Eatock, Rolf Sachs and Jake and Dinos Chapman.

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Each of the designers were provided with three A4 coloured sheets, randomly selected from 12 colours. The artists can manipulate the paper in any way they choose and are to write a short description about what inspired them. The signed works will be displayed anonymously, with the creator unrevealed until after purchase. The artwork should invoke an emotional response within the buyer, regardless of the name behind it. The inspiration for this design challenge and the Joy of Living project itself came from a thought shared by Maggie Keswick, charity founder “above all what matters is not to lose the joy of living in the fear of dying”

Speaking about the event, held at the Grade II, postmodern, listed building One Poultry, designed by James Stirling. Laura Lee, Chief Executive at Maggie’s explained “the design of our buildings, landscape and interiors is integral to offering the best possible support to people with cancer and their family and friends”. The charity has opened 21 centres in 21 years, across the UK with the support of Max Fraser and the Joy of Living project. Lee further stating, “good design is core to our belief in the best psychological support and partnering with the design industry means we can constantly learn what the best design looks like”

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Anonymous for Maggie’s Centres, Joy of Living project

For this year’s event Max Fraser has collaborated with friend, Aynsley Munsie and Amy Bicknell, project co-ordinator, along with various other generous supporters. All proceeds from the artworks sale will go to Maggie’s Centres Charity.

by Pierra George-Robertson

Front Page Image: Joy of Living project for Maggie’s Centres, Anonymous

Joy of Living will be exhibited at One Poultry from September 5-10, from 10am – 7pm

All artwork is available to view and bid at Maggie’s Centres

View on location at One Poultry from September 5

Donate to Maggie’s Centres.

Victoria and Albert Museum Celebrate the Legacy of Plywood

PLYWOOD is a versatile material with unique qualities which offers designers infinite possibilities for creativity. When steamed, curved and moulded plywood can be manipulated into curvaceous architectural forms or laser cut using the latest technology to create intricate lace-like tracery. Even plywood scraps can be re-purposed to make eco-friendly furniture pieces.

In celebration of this remarkable material, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London mounts Plywood: Material of the Modern World, a new exhibition which highlights the significance of plywood design this summer. Iconic designs of the twentieth century relating to architecture, furniture making and transport feature throughout the displays and bring to light the ground-breaking advances in plywood manufacture which include 19th century rotary cutting and the pioneering moulding techniques of the 1930s. Christopher Wilk, exhibition co-curator and Keeper of Furniture, Textiles and Fashion at the V&A, said, “Plywood is such a common, everyday material that most people barely notice when it is used. One could say that it has been hidden in plain sight.”

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Moulded plywood chair designed by Grete Jalk, 1963. Photograph courtesy of Victoria and Albert Museum, London

On display will be well-known furniture pieces by Alvar Aalto, Robin Day, Charles and Ray Eames and Grete Jalk, working drawings and a fascinating array of transport designs which include a plywood canoe, a 1960s racing car with a plywood chassis and a number of vintage skateboards.

Victoria and Albert Museum, plywood, design, exhibitionDrawing of Alvar Aalto designed Finnish Pavilion at the New York World’s Fair of 1939-‘40.
Courtesy of Alvar Aalto Museum

An intriguing cluster of sculptural forms designed by Canadian-based company, Patkau Architects will be exhibited outside in the V and A’s John Madejski Garden. Cleverly constructed to withstand freezing temperatures, these plywood ice-skating shelters float on the frozen Winnipeg River and provide a welcome respite from the biting wind. Fixed to a timber frame, their flexible plywood sheets sway and creak with the elements.

Victoria and Albert Museum, plywood, design, exhibitionPatkau Architects, Ice skating shelters, Winnipeg, 2012, Courtesy of Patkau Architects

 

by Miranda Charalambous

Plywood: Material of the Modern World, sponsored by Made.com and supported by the American Friends of the V&A (AFV&A) opens from July 15 – 12 November 12, 2017 in the Porter Gallery at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7942 2000

Email: contact@vam.ac.uk

Front page image: Patkau Architects, Ice skating shelters, Winnipeg, 2012, Courtesy of Patkau Architects

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marion Vidal Debuts her SS17 Jewellery Collection

PART-architect, part-sculptor and part-fashion designer, Parisian-based jewellery artist Marion Vidal has released her SS17 collection which reflects the harmonising of contrasted materials, shapes and colours that characterises her brand.

After gaining a degree in architecture, which was followed by the Montpellier-born Vidal taking a fashion course at the prestigious Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Vidal set up her jewellery company which has an unconventional approach to jewellery design which is centred on striving for a beautiful balance between contrasting elements such as industrial brass against fragile cloth; matted white ceramic against polished gold; and supple fabric against solid silver. The result is highly sophisticated and entirely unique pieces.

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A Ballade Necklace. Photograph: Marion Vidal

The SS17 collection features the Ballade necklaces which – like the notes on a stave – are composed of curvilinear shapes and small circles fashioned from gleaming metals, in which fluidity and solidity contrast yet complement one another.

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Path rings. Photograph: Marion Vidal

The Path pieces meanwhile highlight the azure blue of lapis lazuli, the delicate pink of quartz or the lustrous black of obsidian which are sculpted into bold geometric shapes – such as a square pendant necklace, or distorted rings which wrap around the finger in irregular, non-linear forms.

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A Ballade necklace. Photograph: Marion Vidal

The Medullary line comprises reinterpretations of Vidal’s most emblematic pieces – the Gela, TacTac and Jabot necklaces for example – reimagined in vivid, intense colours.

by Hannah Bergin

Marion Vidal, 13 avenue Trudaine, 75009 Paris
Open from Monday to Saturday 13:00 —  19:00

Email: contact@marionvidal.com
Tel : +33 (0)1 81 29 19 86
Mobile : +33 (0)6 46 91 04 59

For information about Marion Vidal’s range, visit her website here

Tomas Maier of Bottega Veneta Honoured by World Monuments Fund

TOMAS Maier, Bottega Veneta’s Creative Director, was this week honoured by the World Monuments Fund for his commitment to the protection of Japan’s modern architecture. At the organisation’s annual Hadrian Gala held in New York city, Maier became the honoured recipient of its 2016 Watch Award.

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Tomas Maier and Japanese Architect Toshiko Mori

In 2014, Tokyo’s Hotel Okura – regarded a modern architectural marvel – was under threat of demolition amidst extensive reconstruction plans making way for the 2020 Olympic Games. Unlike the city’s older, more traditional architecture, the Hotel was exempt from national protection. But Maier – whose interest in arts and culture extends well beyond fashion design and into the architectural domain – initiated a number of campaigns involving leading architects, designers and artists which sought to promote awareness of the issue, and ultimately, prevent Okura’s destruction.

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Hotel Okura

Bottega Veneta has long been committed to the protection of local heritage, recognising its importance to the development of future generations and has, over the years, taken part in a number of international projects supporting preservation schemes.

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Hotel Okura

by Hannah Bergin

Bulgari Donates to Terme di Caracalla’s Mosaic Floor Restoration

BULGARI’s CEO Jean-Christophe Babin and Rome’s Colosseo and archaeological superintendent, Franceso Prosperetti, have teamed up to announce the restoration of Terme di Caracalla’s polychrome mosaic floor in the western gymnasium.

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Terme di Caracalla. Photograph courtesy and copyright: Bulgari

Before restoration works began, the fine mosaic floor was obscured by fabric and soil to protect it from degradation. However, thanks to Bulgari’s donation the superintedency has been able to complete restoration works to the mosaic floor and will continue to fund the completion of additional restorative work.

To Bulgari the restoration is viewed as a tribute to a monument that has been the source of inspiration for the brand’s Divas’ Dream jewellery collection, whose motif resembles the pure and perfect lines of Terme di Caracalla’s mosaics.

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Jean-Christophe Babin. Photograph courtesy and copyright: Bulgari

Terme di Caracalla is regarded as an archeological jewel that reflects the grandeur of Rome’s history and fills the brand with pride. Therefore, Bulgari has renewed its support to an initiative that will return to Terme di Caracalla in the future.

by Rebecca Acres