Archives for artist

Van Gogh Museum Presents Zeng Fanzhi Exhibition

THIS MONTH the Van Gogh Museum opened a show entitled Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh, which showcases five works by contemporary Chinese artist Zeng Fanzhi.

Zeng Fanzhi has previously exhibited his work at The National Art Museum of China, Musée du Louvre, Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. His work conforms to an expressionistic style and technique, of which Van Gogh has been credited as a direct influence.

Zeng Fanzhi, Van Gogh II, 2017. Photograph courtesy: the Van Gogh Museum

Zeng Fanzhi has created a set of six paintings inspired by Van Gogh’s self-portraits for the museum, three of which are on display for the first time at the exhibition. Also included is a still life of his boots inspired by Gogh’s famous paintings of shoes, and a large piece reminiscent of Gogh’s Wheatfield with Crows.

Zeng Fanzhi, Boots, 2009. Photograph courtesy: the Van Gogh Museum


Zeng Fanzhi, Wheatfield with Crows, 2017. Photograph courtesy: the Van Gogh Museum

The exhibition is part of an ongoing series at the museum, aimed at displaying the range of artists who have been influenced by Van Gogh.

A comprehensive book is also being published alongside showcase, which will discuss the artistic link between the two painters.

by Rosie Byers

Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh is open on the third floor of the Van Gogh Museum, Museumplein 6, 1071 DJ Amsterdam, Netherlands, from October 20 until February 25, 2018.

The project was made in collaboration with the Fanzhi Foundation and the artist’s studio team, and supported exclusively by Mr. Chung-kiu Cheung and Mrs. Cecilia Cheung, members of the Yellow House.

Embassy, New Book by Frances Aviva Blane Published

THE LONDON-based artist, Frances Aviva Blane has just published Embassy, her second book which follows the success of Two Faces, an exhibition at the German Ambassador’s Residence in London in which a large selection of her paintings and drawings were included this year. As well as work from the show, the book includes an essay by the leading British artist and printmaker, Tess Jaray about Blane’s work.

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistFail. Oil/linen, 90 x 90 cm, Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

In her foreward to the book, Jaray describes Blane’s emotive gestures as “painting straight from the heart to the canvas”. Blane draws and paints with alacrity but her work is not random but thoughtfully planned and, as the artist explains, “hard to make”.

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistHimmler Court. Acrylic/Charcoal/Khadi, 47 x 47 cm. Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

Blane exploits the theatrics of vivid colour as it hits the canvas with her innovative use of paint. Sometimes pink wells up in a rush of emotion and simmers under mascara streaked tears. Yellow gets spiked with black and mingles with wet globs from the tube. Blane also enjoys the limitation of working in one colour, as her big black oils demonstrate. In these, she rips, gouges and scrapes the surface until it seethes like hot tar but in others, she thins the paint to a watery drizzle like rain from heavy dark skies.

 

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistSky, [Detail]. Oil/linen, 60 x 60 cm. Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

An abstract expressionist artist, Blane works in an unusual way as she also draws figuratively. In these large canvases, the scrawled personalities of Blane’s heads become metaphors in paint as it breaks up. She welcomes the element of surprise as the paint drips and is allowed to take its own course. The effects of these marks can be disturbing, confrontational or plain hectic but some seem otherworldly as they deconstruct, fall and float free.

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistDerail. Oil/linen, 198 x 198 cm. Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistFebruary, [Detail]. Oil/linen, 90 x 90, Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

Blane is represented by the De Queeste Kunstkamers art gallery in Belgium where her drawings have been exhibited alongside work by Francis Bacon and Louise Bourgeois. Recently, her work was selected by film-maker Jordan Baseman and will be on show at Creekside Open later this year.

by Miranda Charalambous

Front page image: Heart, Oil/linen, 60 x 60 cm. Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CultureLabel Auction Artist-Decorated Eggs For Easter

A DOZEN wooden eggs, stunningly decorated by 12 contemporary British artists are to be auctioned at the end of this month. British-based art gallery and online retailer, CultureLabel has teamed up with The British Hen Welfare Trust (BHWT) to launch The Egg Masterpiece Auction in order to raise funds and awareness for the plight of battery hens. The sale of each artist-designed egg will contribute towards establishing a new BHWT Welfare and Education Centre in Devon. The Trust’s founder, Jane Howorth MBE said, “We are blown away by Culture Label’s offer to raise money for us by auctioning off what we’re sure will be incredible, unique pieces of art.”

Culture Label, The British Hen Welfare Trust, Egg Masterpiece AuctionEgg Masterpiece by David Shillinglaw. Courtesy of Culture Label

Since 2005, BHWT has rescued and rehabilitated over 500,000 commercial laying hens. Jane Howorth initiated the Charity after watching a BBC Panorama documentary, in 1977 which highlighted the dire conditions within battery cages. Public interest in the concerns surrounding battery farming grew after BHWT featured in the Channel Four programme, Jamie’s Fowl Dinners and the BBC documentary, The Private Life of Chickens.

Culture Label, The British Hen Welfare Trust, Egg Masterpiece AuctionEgg Masterpiece by Mr Doodle. Courtesy of Culture Label

Either quasi-religious, stippled with paint or doodled to perfection, Egg Masterpieces have proved to be wonderfully original. Some artists certainly travel that extra mile for their inspiration, like Mark Adlington who journeyed to the Arctic in search of polar bears.

Culture Label, The British Hen Welfare Trust, Egg Masterpiece AuctionEgg Masterpiece by Mark Adlington. Courtesy of Culture Label

Egg decorating is certainly tricky, even for an Egg Masterpiece expert, as London-based artist Steven Quinn explains,“I think I somewhat underestimated the geometry involved but I got there in the end!”

Street artist, David Shillinglaw experimented with various ideas but settled eventually for one of his classic designs, a bandit wearing a bandana. He maintains, “The inspiration of the design was the shape of the egg itself, because it’s quite difficult shape; you can’t paint everything you’d want to paint on that surface.”

 

Culture Label, The British Hen Welfare Trust, Egg Masterpiece Auction

Prolate Spherical, Egg Masterpiece by Steven Quinn. Courtesy of Culture Label

by Miranda Charalambous

The Egg Masterpiece Auction is on until April 30 2017. For more information, please visit the Culture Label site

For more information about selling your products on CultureLabel:
Telephone: 020 7908 1615
Email: felicity.souter@culturelabel.com

Front page image: Out of the Darkness, Egg Masterpiece by Louise McNaught, Courtesy of CultureLabel

National Gallery Shows Masterpieces by Michelangelo and Sebastiano

AN UNUSUAL relationship between the Renaissance master, Michelangelo and lesser known Venetian artist, Sebastiano del Piombo is the focus of a new exhibition at The National Gallery in London. The show, which opens this spring, endeavours to gain greater recognition for Sebastiano whose talents have been largely overshadowed by his association with Michelangelo but whose work was highly regarded by 19th century collectors.

Their creative partnership, which is evidenced through paintings, sculptures and working drawings, took place during a time of great political upheaval, heated theological debate and in powerful opposition to their artistic rival, Raphael. Central to the show are Michelangelo and Sebastiano’s remarkable collection of original letters, which disclose the intriguing details of their professional and personal life and whose writing styles reveal much about the artists’ respective personalities.

The National Gallery, Michelangelo, Sebastiano, painting, sculpture, drawing, lettersThe Visitation by Sebastiano del Piombo, 1518-19, Musée du Louvre, Département des Peintures, Paris, Courtesy of RMN-Grand Palais (musée du Louvre) / Hervé Lewandowski

Michelangelo’s controversial sculpture, The Risen Christ, condemned by the biographer Romain Rolland to be “the coldest and dullest thing he ever did”, although much-admired by the artist’s contemporaries, is displayed for the first time in contrast with a plaster cast from his second version. The exhibition also presents a rare opportunity to view Sebastiano’s work, the Lamentation over the Dead Christ, also known as Viterbo Pietà which marks the beginning of the artists’ collaboration.

The National Gallery, Michelangelo, Sebastiano, painting, sculpture, drawing, lettersChrist carrying the Cross by Sebastiano del Piombo, c.1513-14.
Courtesy of Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

Sebastiano, who was ten years younger than Michelangelo, was born in Venice 1485. The artists first met in Rome while Michelangelo was just completing  work on the Sistine Chapel ceiling.  Sebastiano, a talented oil painter was an ideal partner for Michelangelo who was eager to undermine the success of his rival, Raphael.

After their initial success with Viterbo Pietà, the artists collaborated on two other major projects, the decoration of the Borgherini Chapel in S. Pietro and the Raising of Lazarus which was created in fierce opposition to Raphael’s Transformation for the Cathedral of Norbonne in France. However, their friendship ended acrimoniously when Sebastiano tried to force Michelangelo to paint the Last Judgement for the Sistine Chapel in oils rather than his preferred medium of fresco.

The National Gallery, Michelangelo, Sebastiano, painting, sculpture, drawing, lettersLamentation over the Dead Christ by Sebastiano del Piombo, c.1512-16,
Museo Civico, Viterbo. Courtesy of Comune di Viterbo

by Miranda Charalambous

The Credit Suisse exhibition, Michelangelo & Sebastiano opens from 15 March to 25 June 2017 at The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN.

Email: information@ng-london.org.uk

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7747 2885

Front page image: The Visitation by Sebastiano del Piombo, 1518-19, Musée du Louvre, Département des Peintures, Paris, Courtesy of RMN-Grand Palais (musée du Louvre) / Hervé Lewandowski

Artists Roger Ballen and Hans Lemmen Unleash Our Primal Instincts

A MACABRE repertoire of half-human beasties is unleashed at Le Musée de la chasse et de la nature in Paris this spring.  Collaborating miles apart, South African photographer Roger Ballen and Netherlands-based illustrator  Hans Lemmen create Unleashed, an unsettling combination of re-appropriated imagery which unearths Modern Man’s animalistic tendencies.

Ballen’s photographic scraps merge with Lemmen’s drawings to create a contemporary cave painting alongside animistic sculptures of the artists with their pets. Individual works by each artist are also on display including a video which documents their project. The show endeavours to convey the creative process of each artist and how their art thrives from the fusion of their differing practices. The collaboration has been an exciting challenge, as Lemmen explains, “This is the hardest thing I‘ve ever faced in my career. Until the last moment, I did not know if it would be possible to combine photographs and drawings.”

Roger Ballen, Hans Lemmen, Photography, Drawing, Roger Ballen/Hans Lemmen, Entanglement 2016. Courtesy of Roger Ballen and Hans Lemmen Private Collection

Ballen, a master of psychodramas creates highly original sets in unknown locations near Johannesburg in which marginalised individuals improvise their strange narratives and where animals mingle. His scenarios allude to human survival but man’s inability to escape from nature. Ballen explains, “I think that my works seek the animal at the heart of the human mind, the point where a man turns into an animal … ”

Ballen’s nebulous forms free repressed characters from wires and cables, as if releasing them from the constraints of modernity.

Roger Ballen, Hans Lemmen, Photography, Drawing, Le Musée de la chasse et de la natureHans Lemmen/Roger Ballen, Unicorn 2016. Courtesy of Roger Ballen and Hans Lemmen Private Collection

Lemmen’s graphics and sculptures are fictional works which explore the domains between animals and people. He is fascinated by pre-historic times when our ancestors lived in empathy with, not against, nature. Lemmen alludes to our primeval instincts,

“We are simply animals. We are animals with, of course, a more developed brain.”

Occasionally his work displays a curious role reversal in which Man appears to become a sacrificial offering, and animals are invited to take charge.

Roger Ballen, Hans Lemmen, Photography, Drawing, Le Musée de la chasse et de la natureHans Lemmen, Untitled 2014. Courtesy of Hans Lemmen Private Collection

The show parades a grave and male-dominated world but also a few surprises, like this grisly cytoplasm ingesting human remains.

Roger Ballen, Hans Lemmen, Photography, Drawing, Le Musée de la chasse et de la natureRoger Ballen/Hans Lemmen, Oh No! 2016. Courtesy of Roger Ballen and Hans Lemmen Private Collection

by Miranda Charalambous

Unleashed: Roger Ballen and Hans Lemmen, which is co-produced by the Bonnefantenmuseum in Maastricht, until June 4 2017 at Le Musee de la Chasse et de la Nature, 62, rue des Archives 75003, Paris

Tel: 01 53 01 92 40

Front page image: Roger Ballen/Hans Lemmen, Oh No! 2016, Photograph, Courtesy of Roger Ballen and Hans Lemmen Private Collection

Cathy Wilkes Wins the Maria Lassnig Prize For 2017

THE Maria Lassnig Foundation in Vienna announces the Scottish artist, Cathy Wilkes as the first winner of the Maria Lassnig Prize for 2017. The inaugural award is named after Maria Lassnig, the Austrian portrait painter renowned for her pioneering theory on body awareness. As Lassnig received recognition only later in life, the Foundation’s inaugural art prize is awarded specifically for the achievements of mid-career artists.

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerMaria Lassnig, Der Tod und das Madchen Der letzte Tango, 1999, Courtesy of Maria Lassnig Foundation

Cathy Wilkes is an installation artist and painter whose subject matter concerns everyday life and human experience such as motherhood, gender roles and sexuality. These assemblages recall the imagined lives of people connected with the Possil Pottery, a nineteenth century Glaswegian company that produced stoneware goods such as bottles for Tennents brewers. Poised between their time-worn household relics, the artists’ scantily clad folk cower under their tattered rags. Like treasured samplers, Wilkes’s evocative scenarios expose her frayed emotions woven falteringly within another time.

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerCathy Wilkes, Installation view, LENTOS Kunstmuseum, Linz, 2015, Courtesy of the Artist and The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd, Glasgow. Photograph: Reinhard Haider

Wilkes represented her country at the Venice Biennale in 2005 and was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2008. Since presenting at a survey exhibition at the Tate Liverpool in 2015, Wilkes has exhibited at several solo shows in Chicago, Pittsburgh and Munich. Peter Eleey, MoMA PS1 chief curator explains, “Wilkes’ art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences to reach beyond herself while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of art making.”

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerCathy Wilkes, Installation view, LENTOS Kunstmuseum, Linz, 2015.Courtesy of the Artist and The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd, Glasgow. Photograph: Reinhard Haider

As winner of the Maria Lassnig Prize, she receives 50,000 euros and the opportunity to mount a solo exhibition at the prestigious contemporary art institution, MoMA PS1 in New York. Members of this year’s inaugural Maria Lassnig Prize selection committee included Peter Eleey, MoMA PS1 Chief Curator and Peter Pakesch, Chairman of the Foundation. Other members included the curators Matthias Mühling and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Artistic Director of the Serpentine Gallery, Laura Hoptman, Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art and Sheikha Hoor Al-Quasimi, President of the Sharjah Art Foundation and New York-based artist, Zoe Leonard.

by Miranda Charalambous

Front Page image: Maria Lassnig, June 1983, Photograph Courtesy of Kurt-Michael Westermann, Maria Lassnig Foundation

Jane Carr Collaborates with Hauser & Wirth Somerset and Piet Oudolf

THE latest collection from the London-based accessories brand Jane Carr sees an inspired collaboration between the gallery Hauser & Wirth Somerset and Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf, whose creative vision has shaped the landscape surrounding the stunning Hauser & Wirth estate.

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The Bloom Design © Jane Carr

The limited-edition range of ethereal, highly-intricate printed scarves is available in three different designs; Bloom, Panorama and Meadow – all of which depict Oudolf’s field at the estate, burrowed in the rolling fields of Somerset renowned for their extraordinary natural beauty.

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The Panorama Design © Jane Carr

The blue-and-green-hued Bloom design illustrates the meadow at close range, speckled with the delicate pink flora that blossoms amidst wild pastures. The Panorama scarf meanwhile, is based upon a wider vista of the field, in which a mauve sun-speared sky stretches out over the unkempt grasses below. The Meadow design depicts the estate’s thriving plant life in its striking crimson, scarlet and sienna shades.

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The Meadow Design © Jane Carr

All of the scarves are hand-made in Italy, and stocked exclusively in the estate shop at the gallery, which showcases limited-edition products from carefully curated collaborations between the gallery, artists and designers.

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The Meadow Design Scarf © Jane Carr

by Hannah Bergin

The collection is available from Hauser & Wirth Somerset

Kröller-Müller Museum Shows Early Drawings By Van Gogh

THE Kröller-Müller Museum presents a rare opportunity to see early drawings by Vincent Van Gogh later this month. The exhibition, entitled The early Van Gogh “work against indifference”, is curated by  Auke van der Woud  highlights work from the Kröller-Müller’s extensive collection, the second largest in the world. Seldom exhibited on account of their sensitivity to light, the drawings on display depict the fringes of late nineteenth century society and convey much about the artists’ regard for working class people.

Van Gogh, drawing, art, Kröller-Müller Museum Vincent Van Gogh, Peasant woman gleaning, July – August 1885, black crayon, grey washed, white opaque
watercolour, traces of fixative, on wove paper, 52.2 x 43.2 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum

Accompanying the drawings in the gallery, which is near Amsterdam, are Van Gogh’s comments from his personal letters which reveal a fascinating insight into his tenacious approach to artistic practice, “I say it again – work against indifference – perseverance isn’t easy – but things that are easy mean little.”

 Vincent Van Gogh, Carpenter’s yard and laundry, late May 1882, pencil, black crayon, pen and brush in black ink, brown wash, opaque watercolour, scratched, traces of squaring, on laid paper, 28.6 x 46.8 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum

Although influenced by the work of  Breton and Millet, Van Gogh depicted the drudgery of rural life rather than a romanticised version of it. In a letter to his brother Theo, he describes his studies of tree roots wrenched from the earth as a symbol of “life’s struggle”.  In his figurative drawings, peasants shoulder the hardship of relentless labouring, either digging, gleaning or bent double under sacks of coal, they press on in all weathers. Van Gogh sensed truthfulness in their weathered faces, a quality he regarded more desirable than beauty.

Describing his model and mistress, Sien, he noted, “I find in her exactly what I want: her life has been rough, and sorrow and adversity have put their marks upon her – now I can do something with her.”

 Vincent Van Gogh,  Tree roots in a sandy ground (‘Les rancines’), April – May 1882, pencil, black crayon, pencil in ink, brown and grey washed opaque watercolour, on watercolour paper, 51.5 x 70.7 cm  © Kröller-Müller Museum

by Miranda Charalambous

 

The early Van Gogh: “work against indifference” opens from September 24, 2016 until April 9, 2017 at the Kröller-Müller Museum, Houtkampweg 6, 6731 AW Otterlo, The Netherlands

Tel: +31 (0)318 591 241
Email: info@krollermuller.nl
Front page image: Vincent Van Gogh, Peasant woman gleaning, July – August 1885, black crayon, grey washed, white opaque watercolour, traces of fixative, on wove paper, 52.2 x 43.2 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum

Alice Mogabgab Gallery Shows the Nomadic Paintings of Daniel Chompré

THE Alice Mogabgab Gallery opens an arresting new show of work by the internationally acclaimed and highly original French painter, Daniel Chompré next week. On display in the Beirut gallery will be the artist’s Toiles nomades and Philtres d’amour, striking collections of richly coated relief paintings, evocative of the time-worn hangings of nomadic cultures. These works are unframed and perpetually rolled or folded, ready to travel wherever his art takes him.

Chompré, who began his painting career in the mid-1960s says, “People of my generation were interested in the problem of the flexible support of the paint. I added the nomadic and pliable character. Paint can and join me in my travels and allow my work to be presented”.

Daniel ChompréDaniel Chompré, Toiles nomandes, 2010 – 2016, mixed media on fabric, 300 x 82 cm,
280 x 80 cm © Galerie Alice Mogabgab

Influenced by the subtle shades in the work of Renaissance painter, Fra Angelico Chrompré has developed his own layering technique. Drawing lines in geometric formation with wax crayons, the artist then saturates the entire fabric with earthy stains of walnut and warm ochre. Rubbing, polishing and softening reveals the painting’s layers of iridescent colours and beautiful imperfections that in time, and after many journeys, mature between the creases of its seasoned surface.

Daniel Chrompré, a multi-talented artist, studied fine art in Paris and Helsinki and has created sets, costumes and graphics for The Paris Opera, the Festival of Lille, the Opéra Lausanne and the Theatre des Champ-Elysees.

text 2Daniel Chompré, Philtres d’amour, 2010 – 2016, mixed media on paper, 100 cm © Galerie Alice Mogabgab


by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Daniel Chompré: Toiles nomads et Philtres d’amour runs from 13 September to 30 October 2016 at La Galerie Alice Mogabgab, Ashrafieh Street, Karam Building, Ist Floor, Beirut, Lebanon.
Tele: +961 (0) 1 204984 , +961 (0) 3 210424
Email: info@alicemogabgab.com

Front page image: Daniel Chompré, Philtres d’amour, 2010 – 2016, mixed media on paper, 100 cm © Galerie Alice Mogabgab

Coventry Cathedral Exhibits Work by Magnum Photographer Peter Marlow

Peter Marlow, a prominent British news photographer and a member of the highly respected photography cooperative Magnum Photos, has photographed all 42 cathedrals of the Church of England over the course of four years.

PETER MARLOW CARLISLE CATHEDRAL
Carlisle Cathedral © Peter Marlow / Magnum Photos

The photographs will be showcased inside The Chapel of Christ the Servant at Coventry Cathedral – a space dedicated to displaying works by contemporary British artists.

 

PETER MARLOW DURHAM CATHEDRAL
Durham Cathedral © Peter Marlow / Magnum Photos

Originally commissioned by the  Royal Mail to photograph six cathedrals to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the completion of St Paul’s Cathedral, Marlow became inspired by the unique aesthetics of the sacred buildings he was visiting.

 

CANTHERBURY CATHEDRAL PETER MARLOW
Canterbury Cathedral © Peter Marlow / Magnum Photos

After capturing the cathedrals of Lichfield, Belfast, Gloucester, St David’s, Westminster, and St Magnus in Orkney, a project which resulted in a series of stamps and a miniature sheet, he continued his work photographing sanctuaries. In the course of his endeavour Marlow employed a technique which allowed him to uniquely present each of the cathedrals from a uniform point of view.

Marlow explained, “I began by photographing the aesthetic highlights of each building, but the images seemed to merge with one another. In order to differentiate each place I needed to find a more rigorous and systematic approach, so I adopted the simple strategy of photographing the naves looking along the central axis.”

 

LIVERPOOL CATHEDRAL PETER MARLOW
Liverpool Cathedral © Peter Marlow / Magnum Photos

Taken from the fixed position and at the dawn, all the photographs show the perspective of natural light breaking through the main window and therefore allow the lighting to bring out the immensely impressive features of the buildings in their raw state.

Commenting on the exhibition, The Very Revd John Witcombe MA MPhil, Dean of Coventry, said, “The photographs are an incredible record of the very particular space that cathedrals offer, as places for reflection and inspiration, through both their art and architecture, as well as their religious significance. (…) It will make a lasting impression on those who visit, and encourage them to make their own pilgrimage to other cathedrals in the country.”

by Magda Pirowska

The English cathedral by Peter Marlow will be on display  from April 29 – September 5, 2016
The exhibition is supported and made possible by a Grant for the Arts funded by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.