Archives for beauty

Chanel’s Unique Beauty Destination Opens at Spitalfields

CHANEL is offering its clients a unique beauty experience in the form of a playful and interactive parlour in the heart of Spitalfield’s Old Market. Customers are invited to rediscover the House’s iconic and extensive selection of products in new ways, in the form of beauty consultations, personalised make-up tutorials and one to one sessions with fragrance experts designed to cater to every client’s specific needs and respond to their preferences.

Likewise are customers given the opportunity to sample the latest that Chanel has to offer, by testing new products and exploring the latest beauty trends to have emerged from the Parisian runways.

 chanel-at-spitalfields
Chanel at Spitalfields © Chanel

Exclusive to Chanel at Spitalfields is the Rouge Allure Ink Parlour. Launched with the House’s AW16 line, Rouge Allure Ink – a matte liquid lip colour – belongs to the brand’s Le Rouge No.1 Collection, which both celebrates and further explores the power, glamour and sheer seductiveness of the colour red. The new ultra-fine Ink is exceptionally fluid and silky, gliding effortlessly onto the lips and adhering perfectly with a long-lasting finish. Upon application, it creates a matte texture in intense, remarkably bold colours.

Chanel at Spitalfields offers a bespoke lip menu and an interactive filter screen with which customers are able to sample Rouge Allure shades and experiment with different looks.

by Hannah Bergin

To book an appointment, contact Chanel at Spitalfields call 0207 247 5513 or email spitalfields@chanel.co.uk

Kröller-Müller Museum Shows Early Drawings By Van Gogh

THE Kröller-Müller Museum presents a rare opportunity to see early drawings by Vincent Van Gogh later this month. The exhibition, entitled The early Van Gogh “work against indifference”, is curated by  Auke van der Woud  highlights work from the Kröller-Müller’s extensive collection, the second largest in the world. Seldom exhibited on account of their sensitivity to light, the drawings on display depict the fringes of late nineteenth century society and convey much about the artists’ regard for working class people.

Van Gogh, drawing, art, Kröller-Müller Museum Vincent Van Gogh, Peasant woman gleaning, July – August 1885, black crayon, grey washed, white opaque
watercolour, traces of fixative, on wove paper, 52.2 x 43.2 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum

Accompanying the drawings in the gallery, which is near Amsterdam, are Van Gogh’s comments from his personal letters which reveal a fascinating insight into his tenacious approach to artistic practice, “I say it again – work against indifference – perseverance isn’t easy – but things that are easy mean little.”

 Vincent Van Gogh, Carpenter’s yard and laundry, late May 1882, pencil, black crayon, pen and brush in black ink, brown wash, opaque watercolour, scratched, traces of squaring, on laid paper, 28.6 x 46.8 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum

Although influenced by the work of  Breton and Millet, Van Gogh depicted the drudgery of rural life rather than a romanticised version of it. In a letter to his brother Theo, he describes his studies of tree roots wrenched from the earth as a symbol of “life’s struggle”.  In his figurative drawings, peasants shoulder the hardship of relentless labouring, either digging, gleaning or bent double under sacks of coal, they press on in all weathers. Van Gogh sensed truthfulness in their weathered faces, a quality he regarded more desirable than beauty.

Describing his model and mistress, Sien, he noted, “I find in her exactly what I want: her life has been rough, and sorrow and adversity have put their marks upon her – now I can do something with her.”

 Vincent Van Gogh,  Tree roots in a sandy ground (‘Les rancines’), April – May 1882, pencil, black crayon, pencil in ink, brown and grey washed opaque watercolour, on watercolour paper, 51.5 x 70.7 cm  © Kröller-Müller Museum

by Miranda Charalambous

 

The early Van Gogh: “work against indifference” opens from September 24, 2016 until April 9, 2017 at the Kröller-Müller Museum, Houtkampweg 6, 6731 AW Otterlo, The Netherlands

Tel: +31 (0)318 591 241
Email: info@krollermuller.nl
Front page image: Vincent Van Gogh, Peasant woman gleaning, July – August 1885, black crayon, grey washed, white opaque watercolour, traces of fixative, on wove paper, 52.2 x 43.2 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum