Archives for Chichester

British Artist John Minton Show at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

THE painter John Minton’s lively illustrations were very familiar to British people during the gloomy post-war years of the 1940s and ‘50s. His imitable style, which was instantly recognisable, appeared on film posters, textiles and book covers and captured the spirit of the times. Minton was a leading illustrator and a highly influential tutor at the Royal College of Art who worked in the Neo-Romantic tradition. He was also a prolific figurative painter and muralist and it this aspect of his work that the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester celebrates in a new exhibition. On display are wartime landscapes and paintings that explore current events of the time and book illustrations, posters and lithographs. Other work includes portraits of male students, friends and his partner, Raymond Ray.

John Minton, painting, Pallant House GalleryJohn Minton, Jamaican Village, 1951, oil on canvas, 152.4 x 362 cm, private collection.
Photograph: Courtesy of Christie’s Images Limited/Bridgeman Images and the Royal College of Art

At the outbreak of the Second World War, Minton registered as a conscientious objector but later served with the Royal Pioneer Corps. During this time he collaborated with the artist, Michael Ayrton in designing sets and costumes for John Gielgud’s production of Macbeth. Travelling to Europe and the Caribbean after the war, he became fascinated by the vibrancy of Jamaica where he identified “a disquiet that is potent and nameless”.

His impressions of life there manifest in his arresting twilight scene entitled Jamaican Village, a striking mural in deep green, fuchsia and acid hues that simmer with racial and political tension. Minton refused to conform to abstraction and preferred to paint figuratively. His paintings also reflect his conflict of emotions as a gay artist as he produced work at a time when homosexuality was illegal in Britain.

T202 IM 77John Minton, Landscape Near Kingston, Jamaica, 1950, Ink and watercolour on paper, Pallant House Gallery (Hussey Bequest, Chichester District Council). Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

In Corsica, Minton produced illustrations for Elizabeth David’s iconic book on Mediterranean food. While her recipes of garlic, wine and olives revitalised appetites dampened by the monotony of war-time rationing, Minton’s depiction of  sunny seas and al fresco dining hinted optimistically at a better lifestyle.

John Minton, Painting, Pallant House GalleryJohn Minton, Melon Sellers, Corsica, 1948, Oil on canvas, 56 x 46 cm, Jerwood Gallery.
Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, John Minton: A Centenary is on until  October 1 at the Pallant House Gallery, 9 North Pallant, Chichester, West Sussex PO19 1TJ
Telephone: +44 (0)1243 774557
Email info@pallant.org.uk

Front page image: John Minton, Bridge from Cannon Street Station, 1946, Oil on canvas, 49 x 60cm, Pembroke College, Oxford, JCR Art Collection. Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

Pallant House Gallery Show Early Works By Lucian Freud

WELL-KNOWN for his thickly impastoed portraits of the human body, Lucian Freud painted every bulge, spot and blemish of his subjects with almost forensic observation. Freud’s early work, which is on display at the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester this month, also demonstrates the same scrupulous attention to detail but is surprisingly delicate, precise and decidedly less audacious.

In the new display, three recently acquired works by Freud are shown alongside existing ones from the Gallery’s permanent collection of modern British art and a selection of books featuring drawings and designs accomplished by Freud in the late forties and fifties.

Pallant House Gallery, Lucian Freud, painting

Lucian Freud, Girl with Fig Leaf, 1948, etching on paper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. (On Loan from a Private Collection, 2017), Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud. All Rights Reserved 2017/ Bridgeman Images

 During the early part of Freud’s career spiky pot plants, the odd sea urchin and stuffed animal heads were just as much part of his oeuvre as people. Freud admitted he had difficulty engaging sitters on account of staring too hard at his subjects. However, later he clearly utilised this approach to his advantage maintaining that, “the task of the artist is to make the human being uncomfortable.”

The drawing, Girl with Fig Leaf depicts Kitty Garman, Freud’s first wife whom he married in 1948, the same year she bore him a child and he painted the mysterious narrative, Interior Scene.  Freud used props and plants and in particular, thistles for symbolic effect. He admitted that he only painted the view from a window when he was feeling “strained”, which in this case would have been the beautiful landscape of Connemara in Galway. A strangely ominous and prickly portrait, it is perhaps a reflection of Freud’s impending responsibilities as a father.

GDK619751 Interior Scene, 1948 (pastel & Conte crayon on paper) by Freud, Lucian (1922-2011); 57.1x48.2 cm; Private Collection; © The Lucian Freud Archive; PERMISSION REQUIRED TO LICENSE MORE THAN FIVE IMAGES BY THIS ARTIST IN A SINGLE PUBLICATION,REPRODUCTION PERMISSION REQUIRED – EXCEPTIONS APPLY (SEE NOTES); CANNOT BE LICENSED FOR PRINTS OR POSTERS; English, in copyright PLEASE NOTE: This image is protected by artist's copyright which needs to be cleared by you. If you require assistance in clearing permission we will be pleased to help you. In addition, we work with the owner of the image to clear permission. If you wish to reproduce this image, please inform us so we can clear permission for you.Lucian Freud, Interior Scene, 1948, pastel and conté on paper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester (on Loan from a Private Collection, 2017). Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud. All Rights Reserved 2017/ Bridgeman Images

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Lucian Freud: Early Works is on until October 1, 2017 at the Pallant House Gallery, 9 North Pallant, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 1TJ

Telephone: +44 (0) 1243 774557

Email:info@pallant.org.uk

Front page image: Girl with Fig leaf by Lucian Freud, 1948, Etching on paper, Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud

Fredrich Nagler: Wunderkammer to Display at Pallant House Gallery

A COLLECTION of small sculptures by the self-taught Jewish artist Friedrich Nagler will go on display at Pallant House Gallery’s De’Longhi Print Room next month. The showcase aims to engage audiences with outsider art in order to bring more awareness to work by self-taught artists.

Friedrich Nagler, Box of heads made from cast resin and bax of heads made from bone, © Pallant House GalleryFredrich Nagler, Box of heads made from cast resin and box of heads made from bone © Pallant House Gallery

Inspired by the horrors of the Holocaust, the exhibition focuses on a series of small-scale sculptural heads which were carved, cast and assembled from materials such as bone, metal, ivory, plastic and non-traditional materials such as bread. It will be the first time that these works will be displayed in a public gallery. The arrangement will create the impression of a cabinet of curiosities (or Wunderkammer in German).

 

Friedrich Nagler, Five heads made from resin, © Pallant House GalleryFredrich Nagler, Five heads made from resin © Pallant House Gallery

 

Friedrich Nagler, Heads made from bread, © Pallant House GalleryFredrich Naglar, Heads made from bread © Pallant House Gallery

 

Friedrich Nagler, Three heads made from ivory, © Pallant House GalleryFredrich Nagler, Three heads made from ivory, © Pallant House Gallery

Born in Vienna in 1920, Nagler fled from Nazi-occupied Austria to come to the UK in 1939. He began to produce his unique work in his Hampshire home in 1945 where he used the by-products and off-cuts from various workplaces. By the early 1960s, Nagler began using clay, wrought-iron, ivory and even animal bones to create sculptures of animals, crucifixes and stylised faces. Towards the end of Nagler’s life, he created larger but simpler abstract constructions of masks and animals from polystyrene, plastic tubes and containers.

Nagler refused to sell his work or have it exhibited during his lifetime. However since his death in 2009, his work has been shown in small shows. The show at Pallant House Gallery is the biggest exhibition of his work to date.

by Rebecca Acres

Friedrich Nagler: Wunderkammer opens June  30 and runs until October 16, 2016 at Pallant House Gallery 9 North Pallant, Chichester West Sussex
Tel: 01243 774557