Archives for collage

Martine Rose: Don Pedro Produce a Collaborative Zine

INSPIRED by fashion designer Martine Rose’s AW17 collection, the hyper-colour zine Don Pedro, reflects the style and diverse nature of the Colombian Market in Seven Sisters, north London where the fashion designers runway show took place. The combination of sportswear and tailoring this collection emanates, comes from the masculine form of the office and bank worker.

mr2Martine Rose: Don Pedro, colour lithograph print, A5, 2017

The zine, produced by Harry Fisher, senior buyer for Soho-based designer boutique Machine-A, combined with Britt Lloyd’s photographs and styled by Kate Iorga is completed by the Martine Rose label. Don Pedro, a limited edition of 200 copies takes Ditto’s art direction, presenting collages, typography and symbolism, found within the market setting and conversational fragments from Rose.

mr3Martine Rose: Don Pedro, colour lithograph print, A5, 2017

Features of the A5 zine include fluorescent ink, metallic golds and a variety of textures. The edition is an eight-colour, offset lithograph print and is released this week.

by Pierra George-Robertson

Don Pedro is available to purchase from Ditto London, retailing at £15.00.

 

Paul Nash Retrospective Opens At Tate Britain, London

A RETROSPECTIVE of the work of the work of Paul Nash, one of the greatest war artists and landscape painters of the 20th century, opens at Tate Britain in London. Nash played a significant role in the discourse between British art and International Modernism and was a key figure in the development of British surrealism. The exhibition, which takes its title from the artist’s name displays paintings, sculpture and collage, including his collaborative work with British surrealist, Eileen Agar, paintings from the International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936 and works by the avant-garde artists of Unit One, of which Nash was a member.

Nash was fascinated by the mystical power of the landscape, moonlight and trees, themes with which he maintained a strong affinity. The exhibition begins with his early illustrative work inspired by Pre-Raphaelite poetry and a fantastical seascape of sand dunes and pyramids. Nature assumes unearthly forms such as the tall elms at his family’s garden in Iver Heath which Nash described as “ … three heads fused in cascades of dense leaves spreading out like the crown of a vast fountain.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingEquivalents for the Megaliths 1935 by Paul Nash. Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Drawn to ancient landmarks, Nash painted the chalky hills of Wittenham Clumps and the prehistoric stones at Avebury, the latter of which inspired his abstract depictions of megaliths.

In wartime, his trees ceased to be places of refuge and tranquillity, as in his early work. With their branches hacked off by artillery fire, his trees became disfigured stalks that scar the landscape. Letters home to his wife, Margaret reveal that in the aftermath of battle, Nash sought comfort in the regeneration of nature, “Nearly all the battered trees have come out and the birds sing all day in spite of shells and shrapnel.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingSpring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917-1918 by Paul Nash.
Imperial War Museum, London, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

During the Second World War, Nash decided to convey war differently and nature became a metaphor for destruction. In his famous work, Totes Meer, an owl surveys the skeletal remains of aircraft wreckage under a watery moon. The artist remarked, “…it is not water or even ice, it is something static and dead. It is metal piled up, wreckage.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingTotes Meer (Dead Sea) 1940-1941 by Paul Nash. Presented by the War Artists Advisory
Committee 1946, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery.

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Paul Nash opens from October 26, 2016 to March 5, 2017 at Tate Britain, London SW1P 4RG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7887 8888

Email: visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Front page image: The Rye Marshes 1932 by Paul Nash. Ferens Art Gallery, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Exhibition of Drawings by Female Lebanese Artists Opens in Beirut

AN EXHIBITION of drawings by Lebanese artists, Estel Adnan, Huguette Caland and Laure Ghorayeb is currently showing at the Galerie Janine Rubeiz in Beirut. The exhibition, entitled Doors of Perception highlights the significant role of female artists of the twentieth century and exemplifies how drawing became an effective medium for artistic expression.


art, exhibitions, Lebanese artistsEtel Adran, untitled, 2016, ink and watercolour on paper, 30 x 46cm. Photo © Galerie Janine Rubeiz

resized Laure Ghorayeb, Paten work, 1994, chinese ink on canvas, 112 x 82 cmLaure Ghorayeb, Paten Work, 1994, Chinese ink on canvas, 112 x 82cm. Photo © Galerie Janine Rubeiz

These three artists share a diversity of skills including painting, collage, writing and couture, expertise which influences their intuitive approach to drawing. Huguette Caland’s decorative motifs reveal her natural affinity with the designs of Byzantine mosaics, traditional clothing and the intricacy of hand-woven rugs.

Informed by her memories of the Lebanese Civil War, Laure Ghonayeb weaves narratives and characters within her work that, as she explains, “edge their ways in the outlines I create”. On the other hand, happy memories inspire Etel Adnan, a conceptual artist to create small canvases in bright undulating forms reflective of her love for the beauty and spirit of Lebanese and Californian landscapes.

by Miranda Charalambous

Doors of Perception runs until June 30, 2016 at Galerie Janine Rubeiz, Beirut

The Rose Art Museum presents first Rosalyn Drexler retrospective

The Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University’s first retrospective exhibition of work by the American artist Rosalyn Drexler opens next month. Curator-at-large Katy Siegel and Curatorial Assistant Caitlin Julia Rubin have collaborated to create a highly original exhibition which features pieces from Drexler’s wide multi-disciplinary portfolio.

Rosalyn Drexler, Self-Portrait, 1964. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler _ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New YorkRosalyn Drexler, Self-Portrait, 1964. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler:
Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

 

The title of the show – Who Does She Think She Is? – lends itself to the duality of Drexler’s works and character that both denounces and rejoices in American culture of the past 50 years.

Acclaimed as a screenplay writer and novelist as well as a prolific artist, Bronx-born Drexler has created pop-culture-inspired paintings and collages, socially engaged sculptures and award-winning plays and novels, and photographic and video documentation of the flamboyant performance aspects of her life and work, that reveal Drexler inner turmoil deriving from personal and social conflict augmented by political awareness.

 

Rosalyn Drexler, The Defenders, 1963. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler _ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York-2Rosalyn Drexler, The Defenders, 1963. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York.
© 2016 Rosalyn Drexler: Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

 

Drexler’s pieces encompass her own identity, distinctive moments of which she was a vital figure as well as conveys her unapologetic attraction to sex and vulgarity. Rose Art Museum display follows her engaged work exploring feminist issues, race, violence and masculine power in post war America through to most recent creations.

Rosalyn Drexler, Love and Violence, 1965. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler _ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York
Rosalyn Drexler, Love and Violence, 1965. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler:
Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

 Rosalyn Drexler lives and works in Newark, New Jersey.

by Magda Pirowska

Who Does She Think She Is? is at  The Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, 415 South Street, Waltham, MA and runs from February 12  – June 5, 2016, with an opening reception taking place on February 11, from 5 – 9pm.

Entrance to the museum is free and open to the public from Tues – Sun, noon – 5 PM, with extended hours from noon – 7 PM on Fridays and Saturdays

For more information, visit here or call 781-736-3434.

Front page image: Rosalyn Drexler, Climbing Out of a Painting Ain’t Easy, 2012. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler : Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York