Archives for exhibition

Leiko Ikemura Nominated for the Prix Guerlain 2018

THE Galerie Karsten Greve has announced Leiko Ikemura as a nominee for the Prix Guerlain 2018. The artist, originally from Japan, has been represented by the gallery since 1993. The award, now the highest honour in France for contemporary drawing, was created in 2007 by Florence and Daniel Guerlain.

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018Self by Leiko Ikemura (2008)  ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018

Dancing Trees 15 by Leiko Ikemura (2017) ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018

Dancing Trees 44 by Leiko Ikemura (2017) ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018Dancing Trees 6 by Leiko Ikemura (2017) ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018

Monte Madre by Leiko Ikemura (2016) ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

 

Leiko Ikemura’s work, comprising of more than 30 pastel and watercolour pieces, shall be displayed in an exhibition organised by the Guerlain Foundation.  This exhibition shall assemble the work of the two other nominees for the award, during during the Salon du Dessin held at Palais Brongiart.

by Daisy Sewell  

The winning artist will be announced on Thursday, March 22, as part of the Salon.

The Salon du Dessin opens on March 21 and  is on until March 26, 2018 at Palais Brongniart.

Journeys with The Waste Land Opens at Turner Contemporary

THE Waste Land by TS Eliot emerged out of the ashes of the First World War, signaling the beginning of a new era of literature, art and music. One of the most significant poems of the last century, The Waste Land persistently influences society and culture and has now resulted in an exhibition in which the exploration of the relationship between the poem and visual arts is displayed.

 

Journeys in The Waste Land, Turner Contemporary Exhibition
If Not, Not by RB Kitaj (1975-76). Image: Courtesy National Galleries of Scotland

 

Journeys with The Waste Land at Turner Contemporary in Margate shall consist of the work of over 60 artists and almost 100 objects. It will mark the conclusion of a three year project which envisioned the reconsidering of traditional curation methods.

A mélange of pieces is to be exhibited, including work by renowned 20th century artists, historical artifacts, contemporary works and new commissions.  Artworks range from that of Edward Hopper, whose painting Night Windows (1928) uncannily parallels with the tone of the poem, to work developed solely for the exhibition such as John Newling‘s sculpture Eliot’s Notebooks (2017).

 

Journeys with The Waste Land, Turner Contemporary ExhibitionMargate’s Shelter. Photograph: Thanet District Council, courtesy Turner Contemporary

 

Eliot had worked on The Waste Land while in Margate in 1921, nurturing an important moment in his career. The poem was published the following year

by Daisy Sewell

Journeys with The Wasteland opens on February 3, 2018 and is on until May 7, 2018 at the Turner Contemporary in Margate, UK

Van Gogh Museum Presents Zeng Fanzhi Exhibition

THIS MONTH the Van Gogh Museum opened a show entitled Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh, which showcases five works by contemporary Chinese artist Zeng Fanzhi.

Zeng Fanzhi has previously exhibited his work at The National Art Museum of China, Musée du Louvre, Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. His work conforms to an expressionistic style and technique, of which Van Gogh has been credited as a direct influence.

Zeng Fanzhi, Van Gogh II, 2017. Photograph courtesy: the Van Gogh Museum

Zeng Fanzhi has created a set of six paintings inspired by Van Gogh’s self-portraits for the museum, three of which are on display for the first time at the exhibition. Also included is a still life of his boots inspired by Gogh’s famous paintings of shoes, and a large piece reminiscent of Gogh’s Wheatfield with Crows.

Zeng Fanzhi, Boots, 2009. Photograph courtesy: the Van Gogh Museum


Zeng Fanzhi, Wheatfield with Crows, 2017. Photograph courtesy: the Van Gogh Museum

The exhibition is part of an ongoing series at the museum, aimed at displaying the range of artists who have been influenced by Van Gogh.

A comprehensive book is also being published alongside showcase, which will discuss the artistic link between the two painters.

by Rosie Byers

Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh is open on the third floor of the Van Gogh Museum, Museumplein 6, 1071 DJ Amsterdam, Netherlands, from October 20 until February 25, 2018.

The project was made in collaboration with the Fanzhi Foundation and the artist’s studio team, and supported exclusively by Mr. Chung-kiu Cheung and Mrs. Cecilia Cheung, members of the Yellow House.

Modern Art Oxford Presents Hannah Ryggen Exhibition

THIS November, Modern Art Oxford will show the UK’s first in-depth exhibition of 20th Century Scandinavian artist Hannah Ryggen’s work. The 16 pieces will include an early self-portrait painted in 1914, tapestries that explored fascism in the 1930s and 1940s, and a number of her last works produced in the 1950s and 1960s.

Hannah Ryggen, Blood in the Grass, 1966. Courtesy of Modern Art Oxford and ODE-Art Museums of Bergen.
Photograph: KODE/Dag Fosse. © Hannah Ryggen / DACS 2017

Modern Art Oxford was founded in 1966, and has built a reputation for holding innovative exhibitions. The organisation seeks to engage and educate wider audiences about both the artwork they feature, and its relevance within society today.

It focuses on the relationship between art and ideas, for which Hannah Ryggen’s career provides broad scope for analysis. Ryggen is known to have been consistently influenced by contemporary socio-political events, such as the Nazi occupation of Norway and the Vietnam War.

Hannah Ryggen, 6 October 1942, 1943. Courtesy of Modern Art Oxford and Nordenfjeldske
Kunstindustrimuseum/ Museene I Sør-Trøndelag. Photograph: Anders S. Solberg/Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum. © Hannah Ryggen / DACS 2017

by Rosie Byers

The exhibition is on from November 11 until February 18, 2018 at Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke Street, Oxford, OX1 1BP.

A press review and introductory talk by the show’s curator will take place on November 10 from 11am until 1pm.

For both press enquiries, or to RSVP to the press review contact:
media@modernartoxford.org.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1865 813 826,
or
Communications Manager Clare Stimpson: clare.stimpson@modernartoxford.org.uk.

The exhibition has been organised in collaboration with Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum / Museene I Sør-Trøndelag, and supported in part by an Art Fund Jonathan Ruffer Curatorial Research Grant.

Van Eyck Exhibition Opens at National Gallery, London

A NEW show of the work of Van Eyck is opening at the National Gallery in London.  This autumn, his oil painting the Arnolfini portrait, is set to be exhibited at the National Gallery, providing a unique opportunity to view Pre-Raphaelite paintings next to the work that inspired them. The National Gallery received the Arnolfini portrait in 1842 and immediately captivated the Victorian audience. The Netherlandish/Flemish Van Eyck is one of the most significant representatives of Northern Renaissance art.

'Portrait of Giovanni(?) Arnolfini and his Wife' or 'The Arnolfini Portrait'Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and his Wife 1434 by Jan Van Eyck, Courtesy of The National Gallery London

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was made up of a group of young artists who sparked a revolution in British art. The Convex mirror in the Arnolfini painting is a key motif and it led the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood to explore the themes of distortion, doubling, and reflection. The painting has left an imprint on the Pre-Raphaelites’ work, spreading its motifs like the mirror device, seen in Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s Lucrezia Borgia and a pair of pointed slippers seen in Holman Hunt’s The Lady of Shalott.

mirror-final-versionConvex Mirror owned by Gabriel Dante Rossetti, Courtesy of Kelmscott Manor

The convex mirror has been an important source of inspiration for many generations of artists and so Van Eyck’s influence lives on.

by Marco Pretara

The exhibition, Reflections: Van Eyck and the Pre-Raphaelite’s is on from October 2, 2017 until April 2, 2018 at the National Gallery, London WC2N 5DN
Tel: 020 7747 2885
Email: information@ng-london.org.uk

Front Page Image: Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and his Wife 1434 by Jan Van Eyck, Courtesy of The National Gallery London

British Artist John Minton Show at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

THE painter John Minton’s lively illustrations were very familiar to British people during the gloomy post-war years of the 1940s and ‘50s. His imitable style, which was instantly recognisable, appeared on film posters, textiles and book covers and captured the spirit of the times. Minton was a leading illustrator and a highly influential tutor at the Royal College of Art who worked in the Neo-Romantic tradition. He was also a prolific figurative painter and muralist and it this aspect of his work that the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester celebrates in a new exhibition. On display are wartime landscapes and paintings that explore current events of the time and book illustrations, posters and lithographs. Other work includes portraits of male students, friends and his partner, Raymond Ray.

John Minton, painting, Pallant House GalleryJohn Minton, Jamaican Village, 1951, oil on canvas, 152.4 x 362 cm, private collection.
Photograph: Courtesy of Christie’s Images Limited/Bridgeman Images and the Royal College of Art

At the outbreak of the Second World War, Minton registered as a conscientious objector but later served with the Royal Pioneer Corps. During this time he collaborated with the artist, Michael Ayrton in designing sets and costumes for John Gielgud’s production of Macbeth. Travelling to Europe and the Caribbean after the war, he became fascinated by the vibrancy of Jamaica where he identified “a disquiet that is potent and nameless”.

His impressions of life there manifest in his arresting twilight scene entitled Jamaican Village, a striking mural in deep green, fuchsia and acid hues that simmer with racial and political tension. Minton refused to conform to abstraction and preferred to paint figuratively. His paintings also reflect his conflict of emotions as a gay artist as he produced work at a time when homosexuality was illegal in Britain.

T202 IM 77John Minton, Landscape Near Kingston, Jamaica, 1950, Ink and watercolour on paper, Pallant House Gallery (Hussey Bequest, Chichester District Council). Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

In Corsica, Minton produced illustrations for Elizabeth David’s iconic book on Mediterranean food. While her recipes of garlic, wine and olives revitalised appetites dampened by the monotony of war-time rationing, Minton’s depiction of  sunny seas and al fresco dining hinted optimistically at a better lifestyle.

John Minton, Painting, Pallant House GalleryJohn Minton, Melon Sellers, Corsica, 1948, Oil on canvas, 56 x 46 cm, Jerwood Gallery.
Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, John Minton: A Centenary is on until  October 1 at the Pallant House Gallery, 9 North Pallant, Chichester, West Sussex PO19 1TJ
Telephone: +44 (0)1243 774557
Email info@pallant.org.uk

Front page image: John Minton, Bridge from Cannon Street Station, 1946, Oil on canvas, 49 x 60cm, Pembroke College, Oxford, JCR Art Collection. Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

Tickets Announced For New Designers 2017, Business Design Centre

NEW DESIGNERS, UK’s most important trade exhibition for emerging talent which open to the public, has announced  that tickets are now available for this year’s show. Now in its 32nd edition, New Designers is one of the most prominent industry shows thanks to its unique blend of design education, consumers and industry all mixed together to celebrate emerging talent. Taking place this June at the Business Design Centre, Islington,  the event is renowned for kick-starting the careers by providing a promotional platform for young creatives.

evgeniia-balashova-pink-broochEvgeniia Balashova pink brooch

Divided into two parts, the exhibition introduces over 3,000 design graduates to the wider public and also gives the visitors the chance to purchase their creations.

benjamin-craven-5-copyBenjamin Craven 5

The first three days will present the latest talent in textiles and fashion, costume design, jewellery and metalwork, ceramics and glass and contemporary design crafts. The following days will feature exhibitors in the disciplines of furniture, product and industrial design, spatial design and interiors, graphic design, illustration, animation, motion and digital arts.

stephanie-holt-ufo-bladedStephanie Holt UFO Bladed, Reniform, Hopper RINGS

As New Designers’ organisers strive to show completely new content each year, and also includes a One Year On retrospective presenting the progress of  exhibitors from previous years.

by Magda McCrimmon

New Designers  is on from June 28 until July 8, 2017

Tickets are now available  here

Victoria and Albert Museum Celebrate the Legacy of Plywood

PLYWOOD is a versatile material with unique qualities which offers designers infinite possibilities for creativity. When steamed, curved and moulded plywood can be manipulated into curvaceous architectural forms or laser cut using the latest technology to create intricate lace-like tracery. Even plywood scraps can be re-purposed to make eco-friendly furniture pieces.

In celebration of this remarkable material, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London mounts Plywood: Material of the Modern World, a new exhibition which highlights the significance of plywood design this summer. Iconic designs of the twentieth century relating to architecture, furniture making and transport feature throughout the displays and bring to light the ground-breaking advances in plywood manufacture which include 19th century rotary cutting and the pioneering moulding techniques of the 1930s. Christopher Wilk, exhibition co-curator and Keeper of Furniture, Textiles and Fashion at the V&A, said, “Plywood is such a common, everyday material that most people barely notice when it is used. One could say that it has been hidden in plain sight.”

Victoria and Albert Museum, plywood, design, exhibition

Moulded plywood chair designed by Grete Jalk, 1963. Photograph courtesy of Victoria and Albert Museum, London

On display will be well-known furniture pieces by Alvar Aalto, Robin Day, Charles and Ray Eames and Grete Jalk, working drawings and a fascinating array of transport designs which include a plywood canoe, a 1960s racing car with a plywood chassis and a number of vintage skateboards.

Victoria and Albert Museum, plywood, design, exhibitionDrawing of Alvar Aalto designed Finnish Pavilion at the New York World’s Fair of 1939-‘40.
Courtesy of Alvar Aalto Museum

An intriguing cluster of sculptural forms designed by Canadian-based company, Patkau Architects will be exhibited outside in the V and A’s John Madejski Garden. Cleverly constructed to withstand freezing temperatures, these plywood ice-skating shelters float on the frozen Winnipeg River and provide a welcome respite from the biting wind. Fixed to a timber frame, their flexible plywood sheets sway and creak with the elements.

Victoria and Albert Museum, plywood, design, exhibitionPatkau Architects, Ice skating shelters, Winnipeg, 2012, Courtesy of Patkau Architects

 

by Miranda Charalambous

Plywood: Material of the Modern World, sponsored by Made.com and supported by the American Friends of the V&A (AFV&A) opens from July 15 – 12 November 12, 2017 in the Porter Gallery at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7942 2000

Email: contact@vam.ac.uk

Front page image: Patkau Architects, Ice skating shelters, Winnipeg, 2012, Courtesy of Patkau Architects

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pallant House Gallery Show Early Works By Lucian Freud

WELL-KNOWN for his thickly impastoed portraits of the human body, Lucian Freud painted every bulge, spot and blemish of his subjects with almost forensic observation. Freud’s early work, which is on display at the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester this month, also demonstrates the same scrupulous attention to detail but is surprisingly delicate, precise and decidedly less audacious.

In the new display, three recently acquired works by Freud are shown alongside existing ones from the Gallery’s permanent collection of modern British art and a selection of books featuring drawings and designs accomplished by Freud in the late forties and fifties.

Pallant House Gallery, Lucian Freud, painting

Lucian Freud, Girl with Fig Leaf, 1948, etching on paper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. (On Loan from a Private Collection, 2017), Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud. All Rights Reserved 2017/ Bridgeman Images

 During the early part of Freud’s career spiky pot plants, the odd sea urchin and stuffed animal heads were just as much part of his oeuvre as people. Freud admitted he had difficulty engaging sitters on account of staring too hard at his subjects. However, later he clearly utilised this approach to his advantage maintaining that, “the task of the artist is to make the human being uncomfortable.”

The drawing, Girl with Fig Leaf depicts Kitty Garman, Freud’s first wife whom he married in 1948, the same year she bore him a child and he painted the mysterious narrative, Interior Scene.  Freud used props and plants and in particular, thistles for symbolic effect. He admitted that he only painted the view from a window when he was feeling “strained”, which in this case would have been the beautiful landscape of Connemara in Galway. A strangely ominous and prickly portrait, it is perhaps a reflection of Freud’s impending responsibilities as a father.

GDK619751 Interior Scene, 1948 (pastel & Conte crayon on paper) by Freud, Lucian (1922-2011); 57.1x48.2 cm; Private Collection; © The Lucian Freud Archive; PERMISSION REQUIRED TO LICENSE MORE THAN FIVE IMAGES BY THIS ARTIST IN A SINGLE PUBLICATION,REPRODUCTION PERMISSION REQUIRED – EXCEPTIONS APPLY (SEE NOTES); CANNOT BE LICENSED FOR PRINTS OR POSTERS; English, in copyright PLEASE NOTE: This image is protected by artist's copyright which needs to be cleared by you. If you require assistance in clearing permission we will be pleased to help you. In addition, we work with the owner of the image to clear permission. If you wish to reproduce this image, please inform us so we can clear permission for you.Lucian Freud, Interior Scene, 1948, pastel and conté on paper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester (on Loan from a Private Collection, 2017). Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud. All Rights Reserved 2017/ Bridgeman Images

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Lucian Freud: Early Works is on until October 1, 2017 at the Pallant House Gallery, 9 North Pallant, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 1TJ

Telephone: +44 (0) 1243 774557

Email:info@pallant.org.uk

Front page image: Girl with Fig leaf by Lucian Freud, 1948, Etching on paper, Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud

Embassy, New Book by Frances Aviva Blane Published

THE LONDON-based artist, Frances Aviva Blane has just published Embassy, her second book which follows the success of Two Faces, an exhibition at the German Ambassador’s Residence in London in which a large selection of her paintings and drawings were included this year. As well as work from the show, the book includes an essay by the leading British artist and printmaker, Tess Jaray about Blane’s work.

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistFail. Oil/linen, 90 x 90 cm, Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

In her foreward to the book, Jaray describes Blane’s emotive gestures as “painting straight from the heart to the canvas”. Blane draws and paints with alacrity but her work is not random but thoughtfully planned and, as the artist explains, “hard to make”.

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistHimmler Court. Acrylic/Charcoal/Khadi, 47 x 47 cm. Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

Blane exploits the theatrics of vivid colour as it hits the canvas with her innovative use of paint. Sometimes pink wells up in a rush of emotion and simmers under mascara streaked tears. Yellow gets spiked with black and mingles with wet globs from the tube. Blane also enjoys the limitation of working in one colour, as her big black oils demonstrate. In these, she rips, gouges and scrapes the surface until it seethes like hot tar but in others, she thins the paint to a watery drizzle like rain from heavy dark skies.

 

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistSky, [Detail]. Oil/linen, 60 x 60 cm. Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

An abstract expressionist artist, Blane works in an unusual way as she also draws figuratively. In these large canvases, the scrawled personalities of Blane’s heads become metaphors in paint as it breaks up. She welcomes the element of surprise as the paint drips and is allowed to take its own course. The effects of these marks can be disturbing, confrontational or plain hectic but some seem otherworldly as they deconstruct, fall and float free.

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistDerail. Oil/linen, 198 x 198 cm. Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

Frances Aviva Blane, Embassy, book, artist, abstract expressionistFebruary, [Detail]. Oil/linen, 90 x 90, Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane

Blane is represented by the De Queeste Kunstkamers art gallery in Belgium where her drawings have been exhibited alongside work by Francis Bacon and Louise Bourgeois. Recently, her work was selected by film-maker Jordan Baseman and will be on show at Creekside Open later this year.

by Miranda Charalambous

Front page image: Heart, Oil/linen, 60 x 60 cm. Courtesy of Frances Aviva Blane