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Leiko Ikemura Nominated for the Prix Guerlain 2018

THE Galerie Karsten Greve has announced Leiko Ikemura as a nominee for the Prix Guerlain 2018. The artist, originally from Japan, has been represented by the gallery since 1993. The award, now the highest honour in France for contemporary drawing, was created in 2007 by Florence and Daniel Guerlain.

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018Self by Leiko Ikemura (2008)  ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018

Dancing Trees 15 by Leiko Ikemura (2017) ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018

Dancing Trees 44 by Leiko Ikemura (2017) ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018Dancing Trees 6 by Leiko Ikemura (2017) ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

LEIKO IKEMURA @ PRIX GUERLAIN 2018

Monte Madre by Leiko Ikemura (2016) ©Studio Leiko Ikmeura, Courtesy Galerie Karsten Greve Köln, Paris, St. Moritz

 

Leiko Ikemura’s work, comprising of more than 30 pastel and watercolour pieces, shall be displayed in an exhibition organised by the Guerlain Foundation.  This exhibition shall assemble the work of the two other nominees for the award, during during the Salon du Dessin held at Palais Brongiart.

by Daisy Sewell  

The winning artist will be announced on Thursday, March 22, as part of the Salon.

The Salon du Dessin opens on March 21 and  is on until March 26, 2018 at Palais Brongniart.

Pallant House Gallery Show Early Works By Lucian Freud

WELL-KNOWN for his thickly impastoed portraits of the human body, Lucian Freud painted every bulge, spot and blemish of his subjects with almost forensic observation. Freud’s early work, which is on display at the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester this month, also demonstrates the same scrupulous attention to detail but is surprisingly delicate, precise and decidedly less audacious.

In the new display, three recently acquired works by Freud are shown alongside existing ones from the Gallery’s permanent collection of modern British art and a selection of books featuring drawings and designs accomplished by Freud in the late forties and fifties.

Pallant House Gallery, Lucian Freud, painting

Lucian Freud, Girl with Fig Leaf, 1948, etching on paper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. (On Loan from a Private Collection, 2017), Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud. All Rights Reserved 2017/ Bridgeman Images

 During the early part of Freud’s career spiky pot plants, the odd sea urchin and stuffed animal heads were just as much part of his oeuvre as people. Freud admitted he had difficulty engaging sitters on account of staring too hard at his subjects. However, later he clearly utilised this approach to his advantage maintaining that, “the task of the artist is to make the human being uncomfortable.”

The drawing, Girl with Fig Leaf depicts Kitty Garman, Freud’s first wife whom he married in 1948, the same year she bore him a child and he painted the mysterious narrative, Interior Scene.  Freud used props and plants and in particular, thistles for symbolic effect. He admitted that he only painted the view from a window when he was feeling “strained”, which in this case would have been the beautiful landscape of Connemara in Galway. A strangely ominous and prickly portrait, it is perhaps a reflection of Freud’s impending responsibilities as a father.

GDK619751 Interior Scene, 1948 (pastel & Conte crayon on paper) by Freud, Lucian (1922-2011); 57.1x48.2 cm; Private Collection; © The Lucian Freud Archive; PERMISSION REQUIRED TO LICENSE MORE THAN FIVE IMAGES BY THIS ARTIST IN A SINGLE PUBLICATION,REPRODUCTION PERMISSION REQUIRED – EXCEPTIONS APPLY (SEE NOTES); CANNOT BE LICENSED FOR PRINTS OR POSTERS; English, in copyright PLEASE NOTE: This image is protected by artist's copyright which needs to be cleared by you. If you require assistance in clearing permission we will be pleased to help you. In addition, we work with the owner of the image to clear permission. If you wish to reproduce this image, please inform us so we can clear permission for you.Lucian Freud, Interior Scene, 1948, pastel and conté on paper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester (on Loan from a Private Collection, 2017). Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud. All Rights Reserved 2017/ Bridgeman Images

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Lucian Freud: Early Works is on until October 1, 2017 at the Pallant House Gallery, 9 North Pallant, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 1TJ

Telephone: +44 (0) 1243 774557

Email:info@pallant.org.uk

Front page image: Girl with Fig leaf by Lucian Freud, 1948, Etching on paper, Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud

Cathy Wilkes Wins the Maria Lassnig Prize For 2017

THE Maria Lassnig Foundation in Vienna announces the Scottish artist, Cathy Wilkes as the first winner of the Maria Lassnig Prize for 2017. The inaugural award is named after Maria Lassnig, the Austrian portrait painter renowned for her pioneering theory on body awareness. As Lassnig received recognition only later in life, the Foundation’s inaugural art prize is awarded specifically for the achievements of mid-career artists.

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerMaria Lassnig, Der Tod und das Madchen Der letzte Tango, 1999, Courtesy of Maria Lassnig Foundation

Cathy Wilkes is an installation artist and painter whose subject matter concerns everyday life and human experience such as motherhood, gender roles and sexuality. These assemblages recall the imagined lives of people connected with the Possil Pottery, a nineteenth century Glaswegian company that produced stoneware goods such as bottles for Tennents brewers. Poised between their time-worn household relics, the artists’ scantily clad folk cower under their tattered rags. Like treasured samplers, Wilkes’s evocative scenarios expose her frayed emotions woven falteringly within another time.

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerCathy Wilkes, Installation view, LENTOS Kunstmuseum, Linz, 2015, Courtesy of the Artist and The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd, Glasgow. Photograph: Reinhard Haider

Wilkes represented her country at the Venice Biennale in 2005 and was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2008. Since presenting at a survey exhibition at the Tate Liverpool in 2015, Wilkes has exhibited at several solo shows in Chicago, Pittsburgh and Munich. Peter Eleey, MoMA PS1 chief curator explains, “Wilkes’ art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences to reach beyond herself while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of art making.”

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerCathy Wilkes, Installation view, LENTOS Kunstmuseum, Linz, 2015.Courtesy of the Artist and The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd, Glasgow. Photograph: Reinhard Haider

As winner of the Maria Lassnig Prize, she receives 50,000 euros and the opportunity to mount a solo exhibition at the prestigious contemporary art institution, MoMA PS1 in New York. Members of this year’s inaugural Maria Lassnig Prize selection committee included Peter Eleey, MoMA PS1 Chief Curator and Peter Pakesch, Chairman of the Foundation. Other members included the curators Matthias Mühling and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Artistic Director of the Serpentine Gallery, Laura Hoptman, Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art and Sheikha Hoor Al-Quasimi, President of the Sharjah Art Foundation and New York-based artist, Zoe Leonard.

by Miranda Charalambous

Front Page image: Maria Lassnig, June 1983, Photograph Courtesy of Kurt-Michael Westermann, Maria Lassnig Foundation