Archives for jewellery

Mirabelle Fair-Trade Jewellery Brand Drops New Range of British Charms

FAIR-trade jewellery brand Mirabelle is to launch a new range of British charms, each one manufactured in the UK. The intricate designs include classic teddy bear, horse shoe and key charms as well as a number of recognisable British symbols such as the bulldog.

 

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Bulldog Charm © Mirabelle

 

mirabelle-teddyTeddy Bear Charm © Mirabelle

Mirabelle was founded by Véronique Henry, the daughter of a Parisian silversmith, whose extensive travels across the world afford her endless creative inspiration, all of which manifests itself in her stunning and original collections.

 

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Bambi Charm © Mirabelle

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Carousel Charm © Mirabelle

by Hannah Bergin

The collection will be available at Mirabelle online

100% Egyptian Cotton Project Featured at International Fashion Showcase

DURING LFW AW17, a 100% Egyptian Cotton project showed for the second time at the International Fashion Showcase, in Somerset House, exhibiting the work of six of Egypt’s most promising emerging designers: Maram Paris – womenswear; Marsuma by Nour Omar – textiles painting; Norine Farah – womenswear; Okhtein – handbags; Reem Jano – jewellery and Sabry Marouf handbags and jewellery.

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The 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The artists were commissioned to produce pieces which reflected their interpretation of Egyptian cotton as a theme but were otherwise granted complete creative freedom. The stunning results encompassed references to the life cycle of the cotton plant, to the harvesting of the delicate fibre through to the manufacturing of the incredibly versatile textile into finished products. The two ready-to-wear designers for example, embellished classic white cotton shirts with intricate floral detail, alluding to the colourful garments worn by the young women who work in the cotton fields.

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Garments on show at the 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The exhibition was curated by Susan Sabet, founder and editor-in-chief of Pashion magazine, and was endorsed by the British Council Egypt and the Commercial International Bank Egypt (CIB). Sahara by Shahira Fawzy provided the cotton utilised throughout the display while the installation itself – a dreamy North African oasis under a vibrant dusk sky – was styled by Egyptian interior design company Living In.

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100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The exhibit proved one of the most popular at the event – the theme of which was this year Local/Glocal – which  is organised by the British Council and the British Fashion Council.

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Bags at 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

“We are pleased and proud to have sponsored 100% Egyptian Cotton,” said CIB’s CEO of retail banking Ahmed Issa. “The exhibit represents not only the deep and diverse talent of the six young designers and the team that created the magnificent installation, but the vast talent throughout Egypt.”

by Hannah Bergin

Loren Nicole announces latest collection

HANDMADE jewellery designer Loren Nicole has launched her newest collection. Using ancient techniques and no electricity, Loren Nicole’s handmade jewellery collection celebrates ethnographic cultures from across the world and the craftsmanship of ancient goldsmiths.

collage-6Beach hut collection

Each piece of jewellery is designed to highlight the beautiful colour of high karat yellow gold and is produced from gold grain to final finish by Loren’s hand.

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Credit: Rodarte catwalk

Her collections are inspired by a different ancient civilisation’s techniques and aesthetic element, with her first entitled Hellenes highlighting the Etruscan style. Loren’s latest jewellery collection Babylon is inspired by the ancient Mesopotamia temple Ziggurat.

floralsHellenes collection

Loren began her career in archaeology and then specialised her skills at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York through a position as a textile conservator.

by Alice Fiancet

Loren Nicole’s collections are available here

 

Maviada Jewellery Opens Online Store

LONDON-based, Turkish-born, and Mediterranean-inspired, Maviada Jewellery has launched an e-commerce shop, allowing its customers to purchase the brand’s characteristically refined, highly sophisticated pieces online for the very first time.

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Antibes Single Earrings. Photograph: Maviada

The collection comprises earrings, bracelets, necklaces and pendants, each made from 18ct gold vermeil or 18ct solid gold, in rose, yellow and white hues. The classic designs feature a number of ethically sourced gemstones such as aquamarine, purple amethyst and pink tourmaline which add a subtle touch of the exotic, which indeed inspired and remains at the very heart of the brand’s character and aesthetic.

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Bodrum Bracelet Photograph: Maviada

Maviada was founded in 2009 by Istanbul-born Eda Elbirlik, who grew up in the USA but remained profoundly attached to and infinitely inspired by her Turkish heritage. “My inspiration for a Maviada collection comes from many sources, but mainly, my summer holidays on the Aegean coast in Turkey. The blue green turquoise sea waters of the Mediterranean were, and continue to be, a calming influence on me and help me balance my life accordingly. From the soothing colours of the sea, the silver green hues of the olive trees, the bright, multi-coloured glow of the ceramic tiles — they all add to and influence my design concepts for each collection,” she says.

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Antibes Cascade Earrings. Photograph: Maviada

by Hannah Bergin

The collection is available from the Maviada website.
Prices start at £155 with limited edition 18ct pieces priced at £3,025.

Marion Vidal Debuts her SS17 Jewellery Collection

PART-architect, part-sculptor and part-fashion designer, Parisian-based jewellery artist Marion Vidal has released her SS17 collection which reflects the harmonising of contrasted materials, shapes and colours that characterises her brand.

After gaining a degree in architecture, which was followed by the Montpellier-born Vidal taking a fashion course at the prestigious Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Vidal set up her jewellery company which has an unconventional approach to jewellery design which is centred on striving for a beautiful balance between contrasting elements such as industrial brass against fragile cloth; matted white ceramic against polished gold; and supple fabric against solid silver. The result is highly sophisticated and entirely unique pieces.

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A Ballade Necklace. Photograph: Marion Vidal

The SS17 collection features the Ballade necklaces which – like the notes on a stave – are composed of curvilinear shapes and small circles fashioned from gleaming metals, in which fluidity and solidity contrast yet complement one another.

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Path rings. Photograph: Marion Vidal

The Path pieces meanwhile highlight the azure blue of lapis lazuli, the delicate pink of quartz or the lustrous black of obsidian which are sculpted into bold geometric shapes – such as a square pendant necklace, or distorted rings which wrap around the finger in irregular, non-linear forms.

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A Ballade necklace. Photograph: Marion Vidal

The Medullary line comprises reinterpretations of Vidal’s most emblematic pieces – the Gela, TacTac and Jabot necklaces for example – reimagined in vivid, intense colours.

by Hannah Bergin

Marion Vidal, 13 avenue Trudaine, 75009 Paris
Open from Monday to Saturday 13:00 —  19:00

Email: contact@marionvidal.com
Tel : +33 (0)1 81 29 19 86
Mobile : +33 (0)6 46 91 04 59

For information about Marion Vidal’s range, visit her website here

Chanel Drops Chapter 17 of its Inside Chanel Film Series

CHANEL has released the 17th chapter of Inside Chanel – a series of short films created by the company which tell the story of the characters, places, motifs and creations at the heart of the brand’s identity.

The life of its legendary founder Coco Chanel inevitably constitutes a large part of the unique online project, as does Paris – the infinitely-inspiring city where she established her first modest millinery store, where she continued to design throughout her life, and from where the brand still operates today. The project also explores the enduring legacy of some of Chanel’s most iconic products; namely its No. 5 fragrance – the first perfume ever created by a couturier, as well as the jacket – the epitome of the androgynous, nonchalant female elegance which embodied Chanel’s principles and came to define the brand’s revolutionary aesthetic.

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Chapter 17: The Paradoxes © Chanel

Inside Chanel also unveils the significance behind a number of symbols which were of great importance to the designer, many of which are subtly incorporated into her designs. The lion is one such symbol, representative of Leo the star sign under which she was born, which featured on many Chanel accessories as well as on the buttons of tweed suits.

Chapter 17: The Paradoxes, explores the many oxymora that pervade the Chanel label – the creation of a new femininity from a traditionally masculine aesthetic, the excessive layering of jewellery atop the simplest of dresses, the balancing of both practicality and elegance, the embracing of both black and white at once.

The video follows on from the brand’s recent No. 5 L’EAU campaign which adopted the slogan “you know me and you don’t” – indeed an allusion to the label’s inherent paradoxes and an apt campaign for the newest iteration of the house’s oldest perfume, which highlights how Chanel continues to delight and surprise whilst keeping tradition and history at the forefront of the brand.

Watch The Paradoxes online here

by Hannah Bergin

Victoria and Albert Museum Remembers John Lockwood Kipling

THE designer and architectural sculptor, John Lockwood Kipling is the focus of a new show at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London which opens early next year. An influential figure of the Arts and Crafts Movement of the Nineteenth Century, Lockwood Kipling is perhaps better known as the illustrator of Jungle Book and Kim, stories written by his son, Rudyard. Motivated as a young man by the fabulous displays of Indian craftwork at the Great Exhibition of 1851, Lockwood became a keen advocate of Indian craft which he later taught at the Mayo School of Industrial Arts in Lahore, India (now the National College of Art).

Overlooking the John Madejski garden at the Victoria and Albert Museum is an interesting mosaic plaque commemorating Godfrey Sykes’ decorative terracotta work for the South Kensington Museum, as it was formerly known. Lockwood, who took part in the project, is shown carrying a scroll followed by Henry Cole, the first director of the museum.

Mosaic panel after Godfrey Sykes, c.a. 1866, Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Far from being an imperialist, Lockwood was concerned with the decline in traditional craft skills, a consequence of the cheap European imports infiltrating India during the Industrial Revolution. As an architectural sculptor, Lockwood inclined towards natural forms which inspired new designs for industrial art, in combination with the historical works at the Lahore Museum of which he was curator. Writing in 1880, he recorded, “I have observed that very little is popularly known of the fishes of the country; many are curious in form and beautiful in colour.”

Wood Carver from a collection depicting craftsmen of the North West provinces of
British India by John Lockwood. Courtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum

The exhibition, Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab will show original displays first seen by Lockwood at the Great Exhibition of 1851, artefacts chosen by Lockwood for the Victoria and Albert Museum and furniture he designed for Queen Victoria’s homes at Bagshot Park and Osborne House. Lockwood’s fascinating collection of sketches depicting Indian wood-carvers, metallurgists, ceramists, jewellery and toy makers will also be on display. Other exhibits include a piano decorated by Edward Burne-Jones played by Lockwood’s wife, Alice Macdonald and her embroidery for the Red House, the home of William Morris.

Bracelet shown at the Great Exhibition made in Rajasthan, India, c.a. 1850, Victoria and Albert Museum, London

by Miranda Charalambous

The free exhibition, Lockwood Kipling: Arts and Crafts in the Punjab, made in collaboration with the Bard Graduate Center, New York opens from January 14 until April 2, 2017 at The Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7942 2000
Email: contact@vam.ac.uk

Front page image: The Great Exhibition, India No.4 by Joseph Nash, c.a. 1851, Royal Collection Trust, Courtesy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 2016

New Designers 2016 Awards Announced At Business Design Centre

THE winners of the much-coveted New Designers 2016 Awards have been announced at Part 1 of the 31st Edition of New Designers held at the Business Design Centre in Islington, London. New Designers is a major British  based exhibition for emerging talent in fashion, illustration, craft, furniture, textiles, jewellery, industrial and product design. The winner of the BDC New Designer of the Year Award is presented to Rob Anderson, a talented metalwork designer. Judges praised his collection, Heavy Hands as work that “exudes authenticity and the skill of the true craftsman”.

In addition to cash prizes worth £1,500, Anderson also receives legal advice from property lawyer Briffa, assistance from legal experts, Rhodes and Rhodes and marketing instruction from Four Colman Getty. The runner up for the award is Claire Fowler for her expertly glazed tableware designs.

New designers Awards, new Designers SurveytextilesNew Designers Worshipful Company of Weavers Associate prize Winner Lydia Hiles.
Photograph: New Designers Awards 2016, Business Design Centre

Rebecca Garforth, a gifted textile designer, is awarded the New Designers Tigerprint Award for her humorous designs of treehouses and tropical scenery regarded by judges as “bold, confident and clean”. Other awards were presented to Chloe Lewis, Sheng Zhang, Chen Cheng, Chelsea Imlack, Sophie Thorne, Rhianna Parker-Yates, Amelia-Rose Chambers, Cripa Yangkhung, Grace Hancock, Hannah Tounsend and the Swedish School of Textiles, University of Boras.

 clothworkersNew Designers Clockworkers’ Company Associate prizes for prize Winner Bronte Adam.
Photograph: New Designers Awards 2016, Business Design Centre

Axel Scheffler, the award-winning illustrator presenting the awards remarked, “I have been so impressed by what I’ve seen tonight. These designers are all at the beginning of their careers and I wish them all the very, very best.”

by Miranda Charalambous

New Designers 2016 Awards opens from until July 2, 2016 (Part 1) and from July 6 – July 9, 2016 (Part 2) at the Business Design Centre, 52 Upper Street, London N1 0QH

Front page image: New Designers Wilcom Associate Prize Winner, Huddersfield University. Photograph: New Designers Awards 2016, Business Design Centre

Bulgari Donates to Terme di Caracalla’s Mosaic Floor Restoration

BULGARI’s CEO Jean-Christophe Babin and Rome’s Colosseo and archaeological superintendent, Franceso Prosperetti, have teamed up to announce the restoration of Terme di Caracalla’s polychrome mosaic floor in the western gymnasium.

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Terme di Caracalla. Photograph courtesy and copyright: Bulgari

Before restoration works began, the fine mosaic floor was obscured by fabric and soil to protect it from degradation. However, thanks to Bulgari’s donation the superintedency has been able to complete restoration works to the mosaic floor and will continue to fund the completion of additional restorative work.

To Bulgari the restoration is viewed as a tribute to a monument that has been the source of inspiration for the brand’s Divas’ Dream jewellery collection, whose motif resembles the pure and perfect lines of Terme di Caracalla’s mosaics.

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Jean-Christophe Babin. Photograph courtesy and copyright: Bulgari

Terme di Caracalla is regarded as an archeological jewel that reflects the grandeur of Rome’s history and fills the brand with pride. Therefore, Bulgari has renewed its support to an initiative that will return to Terme di Caracalla in the future.

by Rebecca Acres

Future Feast – Winchester ‘16 Fashion and Textile Graduates

THE Vinyl Factory Soho, London was awash with a kaleidoscope of bold seasonal colour and stylish looks at Future Feast a show of graduate talent from the Fashion Marketing and Fashion & Textile Design programmes at the Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton. Guest representatives from the fashion industry including Victoria Beckham, Harvey Nichols and Topman attended the show and waited in anticipation of the Fashion Direction and Fashion Textile Awards which were presented by womenswear designer, Michael van der Ham after the catwalk presentations.

 

Winchester SS1Looks from Future Feast, 2016. Photograph © Winchester School of Art

Winchester SS2Future Feast, 2016. Photograph © Winchester School of Art

Jasmine Broughton, memorable for her fabulous faux-fur outerwear with exquisitely beaded motifs won the Fashion Textile Award and front-line menswear designer, Christine Xu was the winner of the award for Fashion Direction. After the ceremony, guests were invited to peruse a dazzling assortment of preliminary sketches and ideas from the students’ portfolios.

Christine Xu’s collection which won the award for Fashion Direction. Photograph by Geoff Pugh

Fashion Textiles Awards Winning Collection SMALL2A look from the Fashion Textiles award-winning collection by Jasmine Broughton.
Photograph © Winchester School of Art

Fashion Textiles Awards Winning Collection SMALL4Another look from the Fashion Textiles award-winning collection by Jasmine Broughton
Photograph © Winchester School of Art

The innovative event combined outstanding graduate work from the institution’s Fashion Marketing and Textile programmes. These two courses focus on developing students’ creative ability, while aiming to enrich them with the necessary marketing and practical skills required for successful careers in fashion.

by Miranda Charalambous