Archives for Kröller-Müller Museum

Kröller-Müller Museum Presents New Show of Sculpture

THE Kröller-Müller Museum, Holland presents Move On, a new exhibition of 20th century drawing and sculpture which opens later this month. The show, which is based on the theme of movement displays work by Dutch artists Gerrit van Bakel, Tom Claassen, Constant, Martin van Oel, Panamarenko and Carel Visser. Either painfully slow or alarmingly fast, movement is conveyed through an eclectic mix of visionary ideas and humour from the futuristic machine to the tatty soft toy.

Tom Claassen’s sculptures are found in public spaces such as airports, parks and carriageways. His cutesy cartoon animals are monumental pieces but deflate any sense of importance. Claassen’s over-sized rat is sluggish and fat. Divested of razor sharp teeth and scurrying feet, it defies the aggressive nature of its real life counterpart.

Kröller-Müller Museum, Dutch, sculpture, drawing, artTom Claassen, Untitled (Brigid), 1998, latex, sand, burlap, synthetic textile and polystyrene foam,
130 x 390 x 860 cm, Courtesy of Kröller-Müller Museum. Photograph: Cary Markerink

Fascinated by the mythical possibility of human flight, Panamarenko creates imaginary vehicles inspired by existing designs. His jet-propelled rubber car, Polistes is based on the Porsche 917 and takes its name from a species of wasp that fly to a high altitude.

Kröller-Müller Museum, Dutch, sculpture, drawing, artPanamarenko, Polistes, jet-propelled rubber car, 1974, steel, wood, polyurethane foam, rubber,
fabric, glass fibre, silicon, pvc, 98.5 x 209 x 378 cm, Courtesy of Kröller-Müller Museum. Photograph: Cary Markerink

Carel Visser, a constructivist sculptor and collagist from Raavenswaay is celebrated for his elegant minimalist works from metal and concrete. Visser incorporated collage into his sculptures using a variety of materials which included iron, sand, cardboard, glass and even walking sticks from the British Rail lost property office. His work, Cart implies movement with a neat trail of sand which appears to reference the slow drudgery of historical farming techniques.

Kröller-Müller Museum, Dutch, sculpture, drawing, artCarel Visser, Cart, 1981, photo: Marjon Gemmeke, steel, wood, rubber, glass, plaster, cardboard, rope, sand, 117 x 455 x 170 cm, Courtesy Kröller-Müller Museum / Photo: Marjon Gemmeke

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Move On opens is on from November 26  until April  23, 2017 at The Kröller-Müller Museum, Houtkampweg 6, 6731 AW Otterlo, Holland

Email: info@krollermuller.nl
Telephone: +31 (0)318 591 241

Front page image: Panamarenko, Polistes, jet-propelled rubber car, 1974, steel, wood, polyurethane foam, rubber, fabric, glass fibre, silicon, pvc, 98.5 x 209 x 378 cm, Courtesy of Kröller-Müller Museum / Photo: Cary Markerink

 

Kröller-Müller Museum Shows Early Drawings By Van Gogh

THE Kröller-Müller Museum presents a rare opportunity to see early drawings by Vincent Van Gogh later this month. The exhibition, entitled The early Van Gogh “work against indifference”, is curated by  Auke van der Woud  highlights work from the Kröller-Müller’s extensive collection, the second largest in the world. Seldom exhibited on account of their sensitivity to light, the drawings on display depict the fringes of late nineteenth century society and convey much about the artists’ regard for working class people.

Van Gogh, drawing, art, Kröller-Müller Museum Vincent Van Gogh, Peasant woman gleaning, July – August 1885, black crayon, grey washed, white opaque
watercolour, traces of fixative, on wove paper, 52.2 x 43.2 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum

Accompanying the drawings in the gallery, which is near Amsterdam, are Van Gogh’s comments from his personal letters which reveal a fascinating insight into his tenacious approach to artistic practice, “I say it again – work against indifference – perseverance isn’t easy – but things that are easy mean little.”

 Vincent Van Gogh, Carpenter’s yard and laundry, late May 1882, pencil, black crayon, pen and brush in black ink, brown wash, opaque watercolour, scratched, traces of squaring, on laid paper, 28.6 x 46.8 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum

Although influenced by the work of  Breton and Millet, Van Gogh depicted the drudgery of rural life rather than a romanticised version of it. In a letter to his brother Theo, he describes his studies of tree roots wrenched from the earth as a symbol of “life’s struggle”.  In his figurative drawings, peasants shoulder the hardship of relentless labouring, either digging, gleaning or bent double under sacks of coal, they press on in all weathers. Van Gogh sensed truthfulness in their weathered faces, a quality he regarded more desirable than beauty.

Describing his model and mistress, Sien, he noted, “I find in her exactly what I want: her life has been rough, and sorrow and adversity have put their marks upon her – now I can do something with her.”

 Vincent Van Gogh,  Tree roots in a sandy ground (‘Les rancines’), April – May 1882, pencil, black crayon, pencil in ink, brown and grey washed opaque watercolour, on watercolour paper, 51.5 x 70.7 cm  © Kröller-Müller Museum

by Miranda Charalambous

 

The early Van Gogh: “work against indifference” opens from September 24, 2016 until April 9, 2017 at the Kröller-Müller Museum, Houtkampweg 6, 6731 AW Otterlo, The Netherlands

Tel: +31 (0)318 591 241
Email: info@krollermuller.nl
Front page image: Vincent Van Gogh, Peasant woman gleaning, July – August 1885, black crayon, grey washed, white opaque watercolour, traces of fixative, on wove paper, 52.2 x 43.2 cm © Kröller-Müller Museum