Archives for landscape

Tate St Ives Cornwall Opens New Gallery Spaces

WEIRD and fantastical sculptures by Aaron Angell, one of Britain’s most radical ceramists are on display at The Studio and The Sea, a sparkling new season of two exhibitions at Tate St Ives in Cornwall which open this March. Both shows precede the transformation of new gallery spaces at Tate St Ives to be launched this autumn. The first show,  That Continuous Thing, charts the emergence of the 20th Century studio potters and the legacy of their influential ceramic-making.

The show takes its name from a quote by Peter Voulkos, an abstract expressionist artist renowned for his innovative use of tools and inspirational pot-throwing demonstrations. Highlights of the show includes work by pioneering artists, Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada, innovators of the climbing kiln at the St Ives Pottery in the 1920s, experimental work from the ‘70s and ‘80s by Gillian Lowndes and Richard Slee and sculptures by 2016 Turner Prize winner, Anthea Hamilton made at Aaron Angell’s “radical and psychedelic” workshop, Troy Town Pottery, London.

That Continuous Thing: Artist and the Ceramics Studio, 1920 – Today, Tate St Ives, CornwallBernard Leach (1887-1979), Spherical Vase c.1927, reduced stoneware, 14.5 x 14 x 14 cm.
Courtesy of the Tate and The estate of Bernard Leach

The second exhibition displays Sea Paintings by Jessica Warboys, great swathes of sea drenched canvas weathered by the Zennor coast which explore the mystery of the landscape and the artist’s approach to symbolism and form. Apart from these specially commissioned works, Warboys displays her sculptures and films, imaginary narratives that mingle fiction with myth and forgotten histories.

The artists, who works across a range of media, including performance and stained glass, explains, “I am not concerned with how the tableau looks or appears as I make a sea painting, but with the result or record of the process.”

Jessica Warboys, Tate St Ives, CornwallJessica Warboys Sea Painting, Dunwich 2015, 2015, mineral pigment on canvas, 320cm x 500 cm (x 3 parts).
Courtesy the artist and Gaudel de Stampa, Paris

Supporters of the new season at Tate St Ives include the Victoria and Albert Museum, The Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation, The Japan Foundation, Idlewild Trust, and  Galerie Gaudel deStampa in Paris.

That Continuous Thing: Artist and the Ceramics Studio, 1920 – Today, Tate St Ives, CornwallAaron Angell, Flower, Bread Knife 2015, Glazed stoneware, 40 x 35 x 26 cm.
Courtesy of the artist, Rob Tufnell, London and Studio Voltaire
London. Photo: Andy Keate

 

by Miranda Charalambous

The Studio and The Sea comprises the exhibitions, That Continuous Thing: Artist and the Ceramics Studio, 1920 – Today and Jessica Warboys which open concurrently from March 31 to September 3, 2017 at Tate St Ives, Porthmeor Beach, St Ives, Cornwall, TR26 1TG

Jessica Warboys’ film, Hill of Dreams was made in collaboration with the Norwegian artist, Morten Norbye Halvorsen and was supported by The Office for Contemporary Art in Norway. The film will be screened by Tate St Ives in March.

Email: visiting.stives@tate.org.uk

Telephone: +44 (0)173 679 6226

Front page image: Jesse Wine, “I think you ought to know, I’m going through a creative stage some people find easy to connect to” 2016, Glazed ceramic, 82 x 123 x 55 cm 2 parts, Courtesy of the artist and  Mary Mary, Glasgow

Paul Nash Retrospective Opens At Tate Britain, London

A RETROSPECTIVE of the work of the work of Paul Nash, one of the greatest war artists and landscape painters of the 20th century, opens at Tate Britain in London. Nash played a significant role in the discourse between British art and International Modernism and was a key figure in the development of British surrealism. The exhibition, which takes its title from the artist’s name displays paintings, sculpture and collage, including his collaborative work with British surrealist, Eileen Agar, paintings from the International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936 and works by the avant-garde artists of Unit One, of which Nash was a member.

Nash was fascinated by the mystical power of the landscape, moonlight and trees, themes with which he maintained a strong affinity. The exhibition begins with his early illustrative work inspired by Pre-Raphaelite poetry and a fantastical seascape of sand dunes and pyramids. Nature assumes unearthly forms such as the tall elms at his family’s garden in Iver Heath which Nash described as “ … three heads fused in cascades of dense leaves spreading out like the crown of a vast fountain.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingEquivalents for the Megaliths 1935 by Paul Nash. Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Drawn to ancient landmarks, Nash painted the chalky hills of Wittenham Clumps and the prehistoric stones at Avebury, the latter of which inspired his abstract depictions of megaliths.

In wartime, his trees ceased to be places of refuge and tranquillity, as in his early work. With their branches hacked off by artillery fire, his trees became disfigured stalks that scar the landscape. Letters home to his wife, Margaret reveal that in the aftermath of battle, Nash sought comfort in the regeneration of nature, “Nearly all the battered trees have come out and the birds sing all day in spite of shells and shrapnel.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingSpring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917-1918 by Paul Nash.
Imperial War Museum, London, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

During the Second World War, Nash decided to convey war differently and nature became a metaphor for destruction. In his famous work, Totes Meer, an owl surveys the skeletal remains of aircraft wreckage under a watery moon. The artist remarked, “…it is not water or even ice, it is something static and dead. It is metal piled up, wreckage.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingTotes Meer (Dead Sea) 1940-1941 by Paul Nash. Presented by the War Artists Advisory
Committee 1946, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery.

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Paul Nash opens from October 26, 2016 to March 5, 2017 at Tate Britain, London SW1P 4RG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7887 8888

Email: visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Front page image: The Rye Marshes 1932 by Paul Nash. Ferens Art Gallery, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Ellie Davies’ Magical Path To The Unknown

BRITISH photographer, Ellie Davies captivates us with her enchanted landscapes with Into The Woods, her latest exhibition of new and recent works at the Crane Kalman Gallery in London. The artist explores our spiritual relationship with the forest, drawing on our imagination to evoke the stuff of fairy tales. Into The Woods forms part of her series, Half Light, a seven year site specific project at the New Forest in Hampshire.

art, photography, natureEllie Davies, Half Light 6, 2016. Photograph: Ellie Davies

Her new work manifests a more compelling and darker presence, one that spontaneously materialises in a diffusion of golden particles over the trails of dead familiars. Gnarled branches and twisted tendrils snare the dense vegetation and murky pools below the forest’s canopy, intensifying our deepest anxieties and subconscious fears.

mystical, photography, art, natureEllie Davies, Stars 8. Photograph: Ellie Davies

 

This time, Davies captures the oppressive quality of the forest, luring us further along its winding paths on our cheerless pursuit of the unknown. She adopts innovative lighting techniques, painted sculptural pieces and skeins of wool to fabricate her ingenious and effective imagery.

Ellie Davies, Half Light 5, 2016. Photograph © Ellie Davies

by Miranda Charalambous

Into The Woods runs from July 21 until August 20 at at the Crane Kalman Gallery, 178 Brompton Road, London SW3 1HQ

Tel: 020 7584 7566, info@cranekalman.com