Archives for painting

Monochrome: Painting in Black and White at National Gallery, London

THIS AUTUMN the National Gallery will exhibit Monochrome: Painting in Black and White. The collection of more than 50 painted objects explores the use of shadow and light, over the past 700 years, analysing what happens without colour and the compelling use of black and white.

The exhibition, showing paintings and drawing, unites works of the old masters such as Jan van Eyck and Rembrandt with contemporary artists including Gerhard Richter and Chuck Close. The major, worldwide loans allow Monochrome to give an insight into the use and choice of colour, or lack of it. Each of the five rooms shows the viewer a different aspect of grisaille – black, white and grey painting.

Curators of Monochrome, Leila Packer and Jennifer Sliwka remark, “Painters reduce their colour palette for many reasons, but mainly as a way of focusing the viewer’s attention on a particular subject, concept or technique.” Devoid of colour, artists can focus greatly on form and texture within the work.

im1Jacob de Wit, Jupiter and Ganymede, 1739, Oil on canvas, 36.9 × 55.5 cm © Ferens Art Gallery, Hull Museums

Some of the earliest Western artworks in grisaille date back to the Middle Ages, for the purpose of focusing the mind and for spiritual connection. For some religious orders avoiding colour was a form of self-discipline, in the 12th century French Cistercian monks created grey stained-glass windows, with images painted in black and yellow.

From the 15th century, artists used black and white to simplify challenges when drawing their desired subject. The lack of colour allowed the artist to focus solely on light and shade, these studies could even act as a reusable template.

The question for many artists was how to replicate stone sculptures on canvas. Highly decorative and illustrative art, including wall paintings and sculpted stucco, popular in the 15th and 16th century, Northern Europe brought attention to works such as Jupiter and Ganymede by Jacob de Wit, 1739. With the development of printmaking, to fascinate audiences’ artists paintings would often replicate a printed work. The later development of film and photography, beginning in 1839, prompted artists to recreate the effects of this media to respond or challenge specific elements created in the photograph.

In time, grisaille developed from a tool used to assist the painting, into a complete and independent work. As the pieces were inspired, so well considered and demonstrative of the artists skill they became highly demanded.

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Hendrik Goltzius, Without Ceres and Bacchus, Venus Would Freeze, 1599. Chalk, ink and oil on paper, 43.5 × 32.1 cm. The British Museum, London © The Trustees of The British Museum

Colour used by an artist as well as light and space can manipulate viewer reactions and emotions. In abstractions and installations, an absence of colour can often be more thought-provoking.

Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery explains, “Artists choose to use black and white for aesthetic, emotional and sometimes even for moral reasons. The historical continuity and diversity of monochrome from the Middle Ages to today demonstrate how crucial a theme it is in western art.”

by Pierra George-Robertson

Front Page Image: Olafur Eliasson, Room for one colour, 1997. Installation view at Moderna Museet, Stockholm 2015. Courtesy of the artist; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York; neugerriemschneider, Berlin© Olafur Eliasson. Photo: Anders Sune Berg

Book tickets for Monochrome: Painting in Black and White

Admission is charged. Members and under 12s free

The exhibition will be open from October 30, 2017 until February 18, 2018

The collection will be displayed in the Sainsbury Wing of The National Gallery, London WC2N 5DN

The exhibition is organised by the National Gallery in collaboration with Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf and is supported by Howard and Roberta Ahmanson and other donors

British Artist John Minton Show at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

THE painter John Minton’s lively illustrations were very familiar to British people during the gloomy post-war years of the 1940s and ‘50s. His imitable style, which was instantly recognisable, appeared on film posters, textiles and book covers and captured the spirit of the times. Minton was a leading illustrator and a highly influential tutor at the Royal College of Art who worked in the Neo-Romantic tradition. He was also a prolific figurative painter and muralist and it this aspect of his work that the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester celebrates in a new exhibition. On display are wartime landscapes and paintings that explore current events of the time and book illustrations, posters and lithographs. Other work includes portraits of male students, friends and his partner, Raymond Ray.

John Minton, painting, Pallant House GalleryJohn Minton, Jamaican Village, 1951, oil on canvas, 152.4 x 362 cm, private collection.
Photograph: Courtesy of Christie’s Images Limited/Bridgeman Images and the Royal College of Art

At the outbreak of the Second World War, Minton registered as a conscientious objector but later served with the Royal Pioneer Corps. During this time he collaborated with the artist, Michael Ayrton in designing sets and costumes for John Gielgud’s production of Macbeth. Travelling to Europe and the Caribbean after the war, he became fascinated by the vibrancy of Jamaica where he identified “a disquiet that is potent and nameless”.

His impressions of life there manifest in his arresting twilight scene entitled Jamaican Village, a striking mural in deep green, fuchsia and acid hues that simmer with racial and political tension. Minton refused to conform to abstraction and preferred to paint figuratively. His paintings also reflect his conflict of emotions as a gay artist as he produced work at a time when homosexuality was illegal in Britain.

T202 IM 77John Minton, Landscape Near Kingston, Jamaica, 1950, Ink and watercolour on paper, Pallant House Gallery (Hussey Bequest, Chichester District Council). Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

In Corsica, Minton produced illustrations for Elizabeth David’s iconic book on Mediterranean food. While her recipes of garlic, wine and olives revitalised appetites dampened by the monotony of war-time rationing, Minton’s depiction of  sunny seas and al fresco dining hinted optimistically at a better lifestyle.

John Minton, Painting, Pallant House GalleryJohn Minton, Melon Sellers, Corsica, 1948, Oil on canvas, 56 x 46 cm, Jerwood Gallery.
Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, John Minton: A Centenary is on until  October 1 at the Pallant House Gallery, 9 North Pallant, Chichester, West Sussex PO19 1TJ
Telephone: +44 (0)1243 774557
Email info@pallant.org.uk

Front page image: John Minton, Bridge from Cannon Street Station, 1946, Oil on canvas, 49 x 60cm, Pembroke College, Oxford, JCR Art Collection. Photograph: Courtesy of Royal College of Art

Pallant House Gallery Show Early Works By Lucian Freud

WELL-KNOWN for his thickly impastoed portraits of the human body, Lucian Freud painted every bulge, spot and blemish of his subjects with almost forensic observation. Freud’s early work, which is on display at the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester this month, also demonstrates the same scrupulous attention to detail but is surprisingly delicate, precise and decidedly less audacious.

In the new display, three recently acquired works by Freud are shown alongside existing ones from the Gallery’s permanent collection of modern British art and a selection of books featuring drawings and designs accomplished by Freud in the late forties and fifties.

Pallant House Gallery, Lucian Freud, painting

Lucian Freud, Girl with Fig Leaf, 1948, etching on paper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. (On Loan from a Private Collection, 2017), Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud. All Rights Reserved 2017/ Bridgeman Images

 During the early part of Freud’s career spiky pot plants, the odd sea urchin and stuffed animal heads were just as much part of his oeuvre as people. Freud admitted he had difficulty engaging sitters on account of staring too hard at his subjects. However, later he clearly utilised this approach to his advantage maintaining that, “the task of the artist is to make the human being uncomfortable.”

The drawing, Girl with Fig Leaf depicts Kitty Garman, Freud’s first wife whom he married in 1948, the same year she bore him a child and he painted the mysterious narrative, Interior Scene.  Freud used props and plants and in particular, thistles for symbolic effect. He admitted that he only painted the view from a window when he was feeling “strained”, which in this case would have been the beautiful landscape of Connemara in Galway. A strangely ominous and prickly portrait, it is perhaps a reflection of Freud’s impending responsibilities as a father.

GDK619751 Interior Scene, 1948 (pastel & Conte crayon on paper) by Freud, Lucian (1922-2011); 57.1x48.2 cm; Private Collection; © The Lucian Freud Archive; PERMISSION REQUIRED TO LICENSE MORE THAN FIVE IMAGES BY THIS ARTIST IN A SINGLE PUBLICATION,REPRODUCTION PERMISSION REQUIRED – EXCEPTIONS APPLY (SEE NOTES); CANNOT BE LICENSED FOR PRINTS OR POSTERS; English, in copyright PLEASE NOTE: This image is protected by artist's copyright which needs to be cleared by you. If you require assistance in clearing permission we will be pleased to help you. In addition, we work with the owner of the image to clear permission. If you wish to reproduce this image, please inform us so we can clear permission for you.Lucian Freud, Interior Scene, 1948, pastel and conté on paper, Pallant House Gallery, Chichester (on Loan from a Private Collection, 2017). Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud. All Rights Reserved 2017/ Bridgeman Images

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Lucian Freud: Early Works is on until October 1, 2017 at the Pallant House Gallery, 9 North Pallant, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 1TJ

Telephone: +44 (0) 1243 774557

Email:info@pallant.org.uk

Front page image: Girl with Fig leaf by Lucian Freud, 1948, Etching on paper, Courtesy of The Estate of Lucian Freud

100% Egyptian Cotton Project Featured at International Fashion Showcase

DURING LFW AW17, a 100% Egyptian Cotton project showed for the second time at the International Fashion Showcase, in Somerset House, exhibiting the work of six of Egypt’s most promising emerging designers: Maram Paris – womenswear; Marsuma by Nour Omar – textiles painting; Norine Farah – womenswear; Okhtein – handbags; Reem Jano – jewellery and Sabry Marouf handbags and jewellery.

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The 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The artists were commissioned to produce pieces which reflected their interpretation of Egyptian cotton as a theme but were otherwise granted complete creative freedom. The stunning results encompassed references to the life cycle of the cotton plant, to the harvesting of the delicate fibre through to the manufacturing of the incredibly versatile textile into finished products. The two ready-to-wear designers for example, embellished classic white cotton shirts with intricate floral detail, alluding to the colourful garments worn by the young women who work in the cotton fields.

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Garments on show at the 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The exhibition was curated by Susan Sabet, founder and editor-in-chief of Pashion magazine, and was endorsed by the British Council Egypt and the Commercial International Bank Egypt (CIB). Sahara by Shahira Fawzy provided the cotton utilised throughout the display while the installation itself – a dreamy North African oasis under a vibrant dusk sky – was styled by Egyptian interior design company Living In.

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100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The exhibit proved one of the most popular at the event – the theme of which was this year Local/Glocal – which  is organised by the British Council and the British Fashion Council.

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Bags at 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

“We are pleased and proud to have sponsored 100% Egyptian Cotton,” said CIB’s CEO of retail banking Ahmed Issa. “The exhibit represents not only the deep and diverse talent of the six young designers and the team that created the magnificent installation, but the vast talent throughout Egypt.”

by Hannah Bergin

Lubaina Himid Turns the Tide at Modern Art Oxford

THE vibrant paintings of Tanzanian-born, British-based artist  Lubaina Himid shimmer with Zanzibar’s piquant colours but within them, turbulent waters forecast change, hope and uncertainty. Invisible Strategies, the first survey exhibition of Himid’s work is on show at the contemporary art space, Modern Art Oxford. The display comprises early work from the 1980s to the present day, including pieces that have not been exhibited before.

 Lubaina Himid, Modern Art Oxford, paintingLubaina Himid, Metal / Paper, Beach House, 1995. Courtesy the artist & Hollybush Gardens

Highlighting a more truthful version of historical events, Himid appeals to her audience through her lively canvases, textiles, cutouts, prints and collages. The artist explains, “I am not a painter in the strictest sense … I am a political strategist who uses a visual language to encourage conversation, argument, change.”

Throughout her work, strange interiors and puzzling scenarios suggest transition or escape, whilst the myriad of over-painted plates and jugs provide a poignant reminder to past and indeed, present day slavery.

 Lubaina Himid, Modern Art Oxford, paintingLubaina Himid, Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service (detail), 2007.
Courtesy the artist and Hollybush Gardens, Photograph: Andy Keate

 In her work, the legacy of colonial trade, diaspora and conflict become embodied with her personal experiences. The painting series Le Rodeur, named after a nineteenth century slave ship recalls a time of great sadness and change following her father’s death from malaria in the mid-1950s. Travelling with her mother at just four months old, Himid left the shores of Zanzibar for the bustle and bright lights of Blackpool, UK.

 Lubaina Himid, Modern Art Oxford, paintingLubaina Himid, Le Rodeur: (The Lock), 2016. Courtesy the artist and Hollybush Gardens

The distant waves that corner Himid’s transitory spaces allude to peril, migration and her empathy with the power of the elements, “I have never been able to swim properly and am very frightened of the sea and of drowning,” says Himid.

Lubaina Himid is a Professor of Contemporary Art at the University of Central Lancashire. Since her early involvement with the Black Arts Movement of the 1980s, she has campaigned for the recognition of black artists through exhibitions, projects, conferences including research documentaries for Tate Liverpool.

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Lubaina Himid: Invisible Strategies runs from 21 January to 30 April 2017 at Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke Street, Oxford, OX1 1BP.

Telephone: +44 (0)1865 722733

Email: info@modernartoxford.org.uk

Front page image: Lubaina Himid, Le Rodeur: Exchange, 2016. Courtesy the artist & Hollybush Gardens

 

 

 

 

Cathy Wilkes Wins the Maria Lassnig Prize For 2017

THE Maria Lassnig Foundation in Vienna announces the Scottish artist, Cathy Wilkes as the first winner of the Maria Lassnig Prize for 2017. The inaugural award is named after Maria Lassnig, the Austrian portrait painter renowned for her pioneering theory on body awareness. As Lassnig received recognition only later in life, the Foundation’s inaugural art prize is awarded specifically for the achievements of mid-career artists.

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerMaria Lassnig, Der Tod und das Madchen Der letzte Tango, 1999, Courtesy of Maria Lassnig Foundation

Cathy Wilkes is an installation artist and painter whose subject matter concerns everyday life and human experience such as motherhood, gender roles and sexuality. These assemblages recall the imagined lives of people connected with the Possil Pottery, a nineteenth century Glaswegian company that produced stoneware goods such as bottles for Tennents brewers. Poised between their time-worn household relics, the artists’ scantily clad folk cower under their tattered rags. Like treasured samplers, Wilkes’s evocative scenarios expose her frayed emotions woven falteringly within another time.

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerCathy Wilkes, Installation view, LENTOS Kunstmuseum, Linz, 2015, Courtesy of the Artist and The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd, Glasgow. Photograph: Reinhard Haider

Wilkes represented her country at the Venice Biennale in 2005 and was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2008. Since presenting at a survey exhibition at the Tate Liverpool in 2015, Wilkes has exhibited at several solo shows in Chicago, Pittsburgh and Munich. Peter Eleey, MoMA PS1 chief curator explains, “Wilkes’ art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences to reach beyond herself while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of art making.”

Maria Lassnig Prize, art, Cathy Wilkes, winnerCathy Wilkes, Installation view, LENTOS Kunstmuseum, Linz, 2015.Courtesy of the Artist and The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd, Glasgow. Photograph: Reinhard Haider

As winner of the Maria Lassnig Prize, she receives 50,000 euros and the opportunity to mount a solo exhibition at the prestigious contemporary art institution, MoMA PS1 in New York. Members of this year’s inaugural Maria Lassnig Prize selection committee included Peter Eleey, MoMA PS1 Chief Curator and Peter Pakesch, Chairman of the Foundation. Other members included the curators Matthias Mühling and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Artistic Director of the Serpentine Gallery, Laura Hoptman, Curator of Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art and Sheikha Hoor Al-Quasimi, President of the Sharjah Art Foundation and New York-based artist, Zoe Leonard.

by Miranda Charalambous

Front Page image: Maria Lassnig, June 1983, Photograph Courtesy of Kurt-Michael Westermann, Maria Lassnig Foundation

Paul Nash Retrospective Opens At Tate Britain, London

A RETROSPECTIVE of the work of the work of Paul Nash, one of the greatest war artists and landscape painters of the 20th century, opens at Tate Britain in London. Nash played a significant role in the discourse between British art and International Modernism and was a key figure in the development of British surrealism. The exhibition, which takes its title from the artist’s name displays paintings, sculpture and collage, including his collaborative work with British surrealist, Eileen Agar, paintings from the International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936 and works by the avant-garde artists of Unit One, of which Nash was a member.

Nash was fascinated by the mystical power of the landscape, moonlight and trees, themes with which he maintained a strong affinity. The exhibition begins with his early illustrative work inspired by Pre-Raphaelite poetry and a fantastical seascape of sand dunes and pyramids. Nature assumes unearthly forms such as the tall elms at his family’s garden in Iver Heath which Nash described as “ … three heads fused in cascades of dense leaves spreading out like the crown of a vast fountain.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingEquivalents for the Megaliths 1935 by Paul Nash. Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Drawn to ancient landmarks, Nash painted the chalky hills of Wittenham Clumps and the prehistoric stones at Avebury, the latter of which inspired his abstract depictions of megaliths.

In wartime, his trees ceased to be places of refuge and tranquillity, as in his early work. With their branches hacked off by artillery fire, his trees became disfigured stalks that scar the landscape. Letters home to his wife, Margaret reveal that in the aftermath of battle, Nash sought comfort in the regeneration of nature, “Nearly all the battered trees have come out and the birds sing all day in spite of shells and shrapnel.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingSpring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917-1918 by Paul Nash.
Imperial War Museum, London, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

During the Second World War, Nash decided to convey war differently and nature became a metaphor for destruction. In his famous work, Totes Meer, an owl surveys the skeletal remains of aircraft wreckage under a watery moon. The artist remarked, “…it is not water or even ice, it is something static and dead. It is metal piled up, wreckage.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingTotes Meer (Dead Sea) 1940-1941 by Paul Nash. Presented by the War Artists Advisory
Committee 1946, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery.

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Paul Nash opens from October 26, 2016 to March 5, 2017 at Tate Britain, London SW1P 4RG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7887 8888

Email: visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Front page image: The Rye Marshes 1932 by Paul Nash. Ferens Art Gallery, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Alice Neel Retrospective Opens at Gemeente Museum, The Hague

A MAJOR retrospective of the work of Alice Neel opens at the Gemeente Museum in the Netherlands next month. The exhibition, Alice Neel Collector of Souls brings to light the American portrait painter’s significant contribution to twentieth century art which to date, is little known in the Netherlands. Neel’s enlightened approach to portraiture influenced many contemporary artists, including Marlene Dumas and Elizabeth Peyton.

Neel painted the people she encountered during her early married life in Cuba, her subsequent moves to Greenwich Village, Spanish Harlem and eventually, uptown New York. The artist explained, “I paint my time using the people as evidence.”

art, Alice Neel, The Gemeente Museum, portrait, paintingAlice Neel, Jackie Curtis and Ritta Redd, 1970, Oil on canvas, 152.40 x 106.40 cm. The Cleveland
Museum of Art, Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Fund 2009.345. Courtesy of The Estate of Alice Neel

Neel painted the moods of her sitters, often in unflattering poses. Impatient, awkward or disillusioned, her models appear unguarded like victims of an ill-timed snapshot. In the sagging flesh of a fellow artist, or the grumpy demeanour of a lover, Neel sought to expose their truthfulness. Her comic portrayals of Andy Warhol superstar, Jackie Curtis and their partner, Ritta Redd highlight the ambiguity of gender identity and equally, the artist’s liberated views at the time.

Neel was interested in the perception of motherhood within different societies. Throughout her life, she produced several mother- and child-themed works which included loving portraits of her own children but also those that appear macabre or unsettling. Having suffered the loss of her own daughter, she was less concerned with depicting an idealised image of motherhood. These more contentious works proved to be a great source of interest for feminists of the 1970s. Although supportive of women’s rights, Neel did not brand herself a feminist, “If they [feminists] had a little more brains … they should have given me credit for being able to see not the feminine world, but my own world,” she said.

art, Alice Neel, The Gemeente Museum, portrait, paintingAlice Neel, Mother and Child (Nancy and Olivia), 1967, Oil on canvas, 99.7 x 91.7 x 91.4 cm,
Diane and David Goldsmith Collection. Photograph by Lee Fatherree, Courtesy of Alice Neel

by Miranda Charalambous

Alice Neel Collector of Souls runs from November 5, 2016 to February 12, 2017 at The Gemeente Museum, Stadhoulderslaan 41, 2517 HV The Hague, Holland
Email: info@gemeentemuseum.nl
Tel: 31 (0)70 3381111

Front page image: Neel in her Spanish Harlem apartment c. 1940, Photograph by Sam Brody, Estate of Alice Neel

 

 

Alice Mogabgab Gallery Shows the Nomadic Paintings of Daniel Chompré

THE Alice Mogabgab Gallery opens an arresting new show of work by the internationally acclaimed and highly original French painter, Daniel Chompré next week. On display in the Beirut gallery will be the artist’s Toiles nomades and Philtres d’amour, striking collections of richly coated relief paintings, evocative of the time-worn hangings of nomadic cultures. These works are unframed and perpetually rolled or folded, ready to travel wherever his art takes him.

Chompré, who began his painting career in the mid-1960s says, “People of my generation were interested in the problem of the flexible support of the paint. I added the nomadic and pliable character. Paint can and join me in my travels and allow my work to be presented”.

Daniel ChompréDaniel Chompré, Toiles nomandes, 2010 – 2016, mixed media on fabric, 300 x 82 cm,
280 x 80 cm © Galerie Alice Mogabgab

Influenced by the subtle shades in the work of Renaissance painter, Fra Angelico Chrompré has developed his own layering technique. Drawing lines in geometric formation with wax crayons, the artist then saturates the entire fabric with earthy stains of walnut and warm ochre. Rubbing, polishing and softening reveals the painting’s layers of iridescent colours and beautiful imperfections that in time, and after many journeys, mature between the creases of its seasoned surface.

Daniel Chrompré, a multi-talented artist, studied fine art in Paris and Helsinki and has created sets, costumes and graphics for The Paris Opera, the Festival of Lille, the Opéra Lausanne and the Theatre des Champ-Elysees.

text 2Daniel Chompré, Philtres d’amour, 2010 – 2016, mixed media on paper, 100 cm © Galerie Alice Mogabgab


by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Daniel Chompré: Toiles nomads et Philtres d’amour runs from 13 September to 30 October 2016 at La Galerie Alice Mogabgab, Ashrafieh Street, Karam Building, Ist Floor, Beirut, Lebanon.
Tele: +961 (0) 1 204984 , +961 (0) 3 210424
Email: info@alicemogabgab.com

Front page image: Daniel Chompré, Philtres d’amour, 2010 – 2016, mixed media on paper, 100 cm © Galerie Alice Mogabgab

Artists Go Dotty with Pixels at Alice Mogabgab Gallery

DOTS and Pixels, a lively show of painting by three contemporary artists, Léopoldine Roux, Nathalie Grenier and Li Wei has opened at Alice Mogabgab Gallery in Beirut. Inspired by the words of Pablo Picasso, “Some painters turn the sun into a yellow dot; others turn a yellow dot into the sun”, these artists explore creativity in a colourful confetti of splatters, stipples and speckles. Using a diverse mix of materials including nail lacquer, acrylics and China ink, they dot and pixelate their landscapes within three very individual styles.

Leopoldine RouxLéopoldine Roux, Promenade #19 (detail), mixed media on canvas, 114 x 146 cm.
Photograph: the artist and Alice Mogabgab Gallery

Léopoldine Roux brings childhood nostalgia to life by painting dots on vintage postcards. Her dots become surging crowds on promenades, fruity pink umbrellas or fizzy lemon lollipops. Nathalie Grenier’s cathedral on Japanese paper rises from clusters of mottled bluish dots. Cavernous forms dissolve and re-emerge in a scattering of light and shade cloaking the canvas from edge to edge. Li Wei’s sepia coloured painting resembles pixelated photographs but also references Chinese tradition through choice of medium and subject matter. The artist creates images by enlarging photographs to the point of pixelation and then meticulously repainting the details.

Nathalie GrenierNathalie Grenier, Cathedrale I, 2014, acrylic on Japan paper on canvas, 140 x 102 cm.
Photograph: the artist and Alice Mogabgab Gallery

by Miranda Charalambous

Dots and Pixels runs until September 9, 2016 at Alice Mogabgab Gallery, 1 Floor, Karam Building, Ashrafieh Street, Beirut, Lebanon
Tel: +961 (0) 1 204984. See the gallery’s website for opening hours and further information:

Front page image: Léopoldine Roux, Bubble Painting #08 (detail), 2015, mixed media on canvas, 120 x 80 cm. Photograph: the artist and Alice Mogabgab Gallery