Archives for performance

Tate St Ives Cornwall Opens New Gallery Spaces

WEIRD and fantastical sculptures by Aaron Angell, one of Britain’s most radical ceramists are on display at The Studio and The Sea, a sparkling new season of two exhibitions at Tate St Ives in Cornwall which open this March. Both shows precede the transformation of new gallery spaces at Tate St Ives to be launched this autumn. The first show,  That Continuous Thing, charts the emergence of the 20th Century studio potters and the legacy of their influential ceramic-making.

The show takes its name from a quote by Peter Voulkos, an abstract expressionist artist renowned for his innovative use of tools and inspirational pot-throwing demonstrations. Highlights of the show includes work by pioneering artists, Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada, innovators of the climbing kiln at the St Ives Pottery in the 1920s, experimental work from the ‘70s and ‘80s by Gillian Lowndes and Richard Slee and sculptures by 2016 Turner Prize winner, Anthea Hamilton made at Aaron Angell’s “radical and psychedelic” workshop, Troy Town Pottery, London.

That Continuous Thing: Artist and the Ceramics Studio, 1920 – Today, Tate St Ives, CornwallBernard Leach (1887-1979), Spherical Vase c.1927, reduced stoneware, 14.5 x 14 x 14 cm.
Courtesy of the Tate and The estate of Bernard Leach

The second exhibition displays Sea Paintings by Jessica Warboys, great swathes of sea drenched canvas weathered by the Zennor coast which explore the mystery of the landscape and the artist’s approach to symbolism and form. Apart from these specially commissioned works, Warboys displays her sculptures and films, imaginary narratives that mingle fiction with myth and forgotten histories.

The artists, who works across a range of media, including performance and stained glass, explains, “I am not concerned with how the tableau looks or appears as I make a sea painting, but with the result or record of the process.”

Jessica Warboys, Tate St Ives, CornwallJessica Warboys Sea Painting, Dunwich 2015, 2015, mineral pigment on canvas, 320cm x 500 cm (x 3 parts).
Courtesy the artist and Gaudel de Stampa, Paris

Supporters of the new season at Tate St Ives include the Victoria and Albert Museum, The Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation, The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation, The Japan Foundation, Idlewild Trust, and  Galerie Gaudel deStampa in Paris.

That Continuous Thing: Artist and the Ceramics Studio, 1920 – Today, Tate St Ives, CornwallAaron Angell, Flower, Bread Knife 2015, Glazed stoneware, 40 x 35 x 26 cm.
Courtesy of the artist, Rob Tufnell, London and Studio Voltaire
London. Photo: Andy Keate

 

by Miranda Charalambous

The Studio and The Sea comprises the exhibitions, That Continuous Thing: Artist and the Ceramics Studio, 1920 – Today and Jessica Warboys which open concurrently from March 31 to September 3, 2017 at Tate St Ives, Porthmeor Beach, St Ives, Cornwall, TR26 1TG

Jessica Warboys’ film, Hill of Dreams was made in collaboration with the Norwegian artist, Morten Norbye Halvorsen and was supported by The Office for Contemporary Art in Norway. The film will be screened by Tate St Ives in March.

Email: visiting.stives@tate.org.uk

Telephone: +44 (0)173 679 6226

Front page image: Jesse Wine, “I think you ought to know, I’m going through a creative stage some people find easy to connect to” 2016, Glazed ceramic, 82 x 123 x 55 cm 2 parts, Courtesy of the artist and  Mary Mary, Glasgow

The Photographers’ Gallery Showcases Feminist Avant-Garde of the 1970s

THE Photographers’ Gallery in London celebrates the work of feminist avant-garde artists of the 1970s in a new group show which opens next week. The exhibition highlights how female artists sought to turn the tide of art history in response to the changing social attitudes of the time. Challenging the traditional image of the woman as male muse, artists used their own bodies in their work to reclaim the female form. Showcasing more than 150 major international works the Verbund Collection, including work by Cindy Sherman, Francesca Woodman, Valie Export and Martha Rosler, the exhibition covers a diverse range of themes expressed through photography, collage, performance, video and film.

I204-6/6, 11/30/05, 4:19 PM, 16G, 3036x2978 (1611+1089), 112%, Cruz 080205, 1/120 s, R67.3, G57.4, B71.7

Francesca Woodman, Self-deceit #1, Rome, Italy, 1978 / 1979.
© Courtesy George and Betty Woodman, New York / Sammlung Verbund, Wien

Female artists of the 1970s adopted radical new ways to tackle issues of sexism and inequality in what was then, a largely male-dominated society. The performance artist, Valie Export took to the streets of Vienna to assert her female identity in a manner that was considered shocking at the time.

Wearing a mini movie-theatre covering her breasts, she invited any member of the public to poke their hands through the curtains to feel a real woman’s body. Artists such as Lynn Hershman Leeson and Cindy Sherman were concerned with the authenticity of the female image and constructed fictional personas to demonstrate how looks can deceive.

600x400-valie-export

Valie Export, Tapp und Tastkino, 1968 © Valie Export / VG Bildkunst, Bonn 2015.
Courtesy of Galerie Charim, Vienna / Sammlung Verbund, Vienna

Video artist, Martha Rosler addressed women’s lack of empowerment in the public sphere and their imposed domesticity. In her film, Semiotics of a Kitchen the disgruntled artist dons an apron and mimes the ritual of family cooking.
The issues highlighted by these artists should strike a cord today with both feminists and non-feminists. As Rosler states,
“even the most anti-feminist public women are speaking to, for and about women.”

by Miranda Charalambous
Feminist Avant-Garde of the 1970s opens October 7, 2016 – January 8, 2017 at The Photographers’ Gallery at 16 – 18 Ramillies Street, London W1F 7LW
Tel: + 44 (0)20 7087 9300
Email: info@tpg.org.uk
Front page image: Karin Mack, Zerstörung einer Illusion, 1977 © Karin Mack / Sammlung Verbund, Vienna

Welsh National Opera’s In Parenthesis to be Broadcast this Summer

THIS summer the Welsh National Opera’s new opera In Parenthesis will be screened across Wales and broadcast online for free via The Opera Platform. The company aims to reach a wider audience for the show by broadcasting and screening the opera internationally and across Wales. It will be the first time that the Welsh National Opera will be screening a main scale opera in cinemas.

In Parenthesis_ WNO,COMPOSER; Iain Bell, Private John Ball; Andrew Bidlack,Bard of Brittannia_HQ Officer; Peter Coleman_Wright,Bard of Germania_Alice the Barmaid_The Queen of the Woods; Alexandra Deshorties,Lieutenant Jenkins; George Humphreys,LancWNO In Parenthesis. Photograph: Bill Cooper

 

Composed by Iain Bell, In Parenthesis is an operatic adaptation of poet, writer and artist David Jones’ epic poem. In Parenthesis reflects on Jones’ personal experience as a soldier at the Battle of Mametz Wood where he served with the Royal Welch Fusiliers. The opera is an artistic response in commemoration of Wales’ role in the First World War and its losses during The Battle of the Somme.

In Parenthesis_ WNO,COMPOSER; Iain Bell, Private John Ball; Andrew Bidlack,Bard of Brittannia_HQ Officer; Peter Coleman_Wright,Bard of Germania_Alice the Barmaid_The Queen of the Woods; Alexandra Deshorties,Lieutenant Jenkins; George Humphreys,Lanc
WNO In Parenthesis. Photograph: Bill Cooper

 

The online broadcasting falls on the date of the centenary of The Battle of the Somme on 1 July and coincides with its performance at the Royal Opera House. The opera will also be screened in cinemas across Wales.

 

In Parenthesis_ WNO,COMPOSER; Iain Bell, Private John Ball; Andrew Bidlack,Bard of Brittannia_HQ Officer; Peter Coleman_Wright,Bard of Germania_Alice the Barmaid_The Queen of the Woods; Alexandra Deshorties,Lieutenant Jenkins; George Humphreys,Lanc

WNO In Parenthesis, Credit: Bill Cooper ©

by Rebecca Acres

The opera will also be screened in cinemas across Wales From July 3. Its live performances are running in Cardiff, Birmingham and London until July 1. For further details please visit: here

The Rose Art Museum presents first Rosalyn Drexler retrospective

The Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University’s first retrospective exhibition of work by the American artist Rosalyn Drexler opens next month. Curator-at-large Katy Siegel and Curatorial Assistant Caitlin Julia Rubin have collaborated to create a highly original exhibition which features pieces from Drexler’s wide multi-disciplinary portfolio.

Rosalyn Drexler, Self-Portrait, 1964. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler _ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New YorkRosalyn Drexler, Self-Portrait, 1964. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler:
Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

 

The title of the show – Who Does She Think She Is? – lends itself to the duality of Drexler’s works and character that both denounces and rejoices in American culture of the past 50 years.

Acclaimed as a screenplay writer and novelist as well as a prolific artist, Bronx-born Drexler has created pop-culture-inspired paintings and collages, socially engaged sculptures and award-winning plays and novels, and photographic and video documentation of the flamboyant performance aspects of her life and work, that reveal Drexler inner turmoil deriving from personal and social conflict augmented by political awareness.

 

Rosalyn Drexler, The Defenders, 1963. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler _ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York-2Rosalyn Drexler, The Defenders, 1963. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York.
© 2016 Rosalyn Drexler: Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

 

Drexler’s pieces encompass her own identity, distinctive moments of which she was a vital figure as well as conveys her unapologetic attraction to sex and vulgarity. Rose Art Museum display follows her engaged work exploring feminist issues, race, violence and masculine power in post war America through to most recent creations.

Rosalyn Drexler, Love and Violence, 1965. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler _ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York
Rosalyn Drexler, Love and Violence, 1965. Beth Rudin DeWoody. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler:
Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

 Rosalyn Drexler lives and works in Newark, New Jersey.

by Magda Pirowska

Who Does She Think She Is? is at  The Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, 415 South Street, Waltham, MA and runs from February 12  – June 5, 2016, with an opening reception taking place on February 11, from 5 – 9pm.

Entrance to the museum is free and open to the public from Tues – Sun, noon – 5 PM, with extended hours from noon – 7 PM on Fridays and Saturdays

For more information, visit here or call 781-736-3434.

Front page image: Rosalyn Drexler, Climbing Out of a Painting Ain’t Easy, 2012. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York. © 2016 Rosalyn Drexler : Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York