Archives for surrealism

New Lanark Partners with London Fashion and Textiles Museum

INTERNATIONAL travelling exhibition Artist Textiles – Picasso to Warhol from London’s Fashion and Textile Museum will be showcasing at World Heritage Site, New Lanark, Scotland at the beginning of next year.

Artist Textiles has been touring London, the Netherlands, USA and Canada since 2014 and will now be displayed at New Lanark’s new exhibition galley. The show takes a look at the history of 20th century textile art, including the works of Henri Matisse, Salvador Dali, Barbara Hepworth and Andy Warhol. Presented also will be the personal collection of British designer Zandra Rhodes, including the work of leading fashion designers and manufacturers.

im1-nlArtist Textiles, Fashion and Textile Museum London

Influenced by major European and American art movements, including Cubism, Abstraction, Surrealism and Pop Art, the collection of over 200, many unique and previously unseen pieces reveal how people were able to express themselves, through modern art, clothing and furnishings.

Dennis Nothdruft, curator of the Fashion and Textiles Museum and exhibition developer, states “this exhibition highlights the importance of the textile industry in the dissemination and promotion of contemporary art.  Manufacturers and mills had the foresight to work with painters and sculptors to develop beautiful fabrics that democratized modern art for the masses.”

im2-nlArtist Textiles, Fashion and Textile Museum London

New Lanark World Heritage Site, founded in 1785 by David Dale and Richard Arkwright was previously an 18th century cotton spinning mill village. Located near to Glasgow and Edinburgh, New Lanark enjoyed spinning success until 1968. Now a registered Scottish charity, New Lanark has been undergoing renovation to restore the village to its former working glory and attracting over 300,000 visitors per year.

Scott McCauley, New Lanark Trust Chief Executive, said “we are very proud that Artist Textiles – Picasso to Warhol will make its Scottish debut at New Lanark in 2018, officially launching New Lanark’s brand new Temporary Exhibition Gallery.”

by Pierra George-Robertson

Front Page Image:

Artist Textiles – Picasso to Warhol will show from 26 January – 29 April 2018

The exhibition will be held in a new exhibition gallery within one of New Lanark’s 18th century cotton mill buildings.

Find Details of New Lanark’s daily guided tours, printmaking workshops, textile design competition, meals and gift shops here

The Fashion and Textile Museum, founded by iconic British designer Zandra Rhodes in 2003, is part of Newham College London – one of Europe’s largest further education colleges and is the only museum in the UK solely dedicated to showcasing developments in contemporary fashion.

The Fashion and Textile Museum offers an exciting programme of exhibitions and displays throughout the year, alongside an array of talks, events and workshops with industry professionals.

Atlas Gallery Reveal New Surrealist Photography Show

THE Atlas Gallery in London unleashes the creative power of the unconscious in a new show which explores how avant-garde photographers responded to Surrealism. The exhibition, which opens this week, traces the history of the iconic movement through five decades beginning with its launch in Paris in the 1920s by poet, André Breton.

The Psychic Lens: Surrealism and the camera displays almost 50 works by well-known photographers which include Man Ray, Florence Henri and Bill Brandt and work by lesser known artists such as Franz Roh and Vaclav Zykmund. Their work also reveals a diverse range of skills comprising photo-montage, double exposures, solarisation and combination printing.

Atlas Gallery, Surrealism, photography, exhibitionVisit in Night, 1951 © Toshiko Okanoue

The Surrealists sought to uncover the unconscious mind and merge it with reality. They created dream-like imagery by lifting objects from their familiar contexts and re-positioning them in unlikely groupings. The Japanese photographer, Toshiko Okanoue, started making photo collages as a fashion student at Bunk Gakim College during the 1950s. After the Second World War, Japanese goods were in short supply and many were imported from abroad.

Cutting scraps from fashion magazines such as Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar, Okanoue began to create imaginative compositions arranged from body parts, animals and architectural elements. Although having no knowledge of Surrealism at the time, she realised later that, “Without being aware of it, I have planned such delicate nuances of a woman’s heart and sown seeds of such sentiments into my works.”

Atlas Gallery, Surrealism, photography, exhibitionPortrait Composition (E), 1937 by Florence Henri © Galleria Martini & Ronchetti, Genova

Influenced by Constructivism and Cubism, the American artist Florence Henri experimented with mirrors to add greater perspective to her imagery. She overlaid reflections in shop windows and made photo-montages from photographic clippings of classical architecture. She explained

“Volumes, lines, shadows and light have to obey my will and say what I want them to say. This happens under the strict control of composition, since I do not pretend to explain the world nor to explain my thoughts.”

Apart from distorting perspective and the size of objects, Surrealist photographers sometimes used words in their imagery. The German magazine cover designed by Dutch photographer, César Domela-Niewenhuis depicts a giant signpost of painted text looming above the sprawling Port of Hamburg to reveal a cluttered scene of cranes, building and steamships parts.

Atlas Gallery, Surrealism, photography, exhibitionHamburg, 1929 by César Domela-Niewenhuis © 2014 César Domela/
Artists RightsSociety (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, The Psychic Lens: Surrealism and the camera runs from November 24 to January 28, 2017 at Atlas Gallery, 49 Dorset Street, Marylebone, London W1U 7NF
Telephone: +44 207 224 4192
Email: info@atlasgallery.com

Front page image: Ruths-Speicher, photomontage, 1928 by César Domela-Niewenhuis © 2014 César

Domela/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Paul Nash Retrospective Opens At Tate Britain, London

A RETROSPECTIVE of the work of the work of Paul Nash, one of the greatest war artists and landscape painters of the 20th century, opens at Tate Britain in London. Nash played a significant role in the discourse between British art and International Modernism and was a key figure in the development of British surrealism. The exhibition, which takes its title from the artist’s name displays paintings, sculpture and collage, including his collaborative work with British surrealist, Eileen Agar, paintings from the International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936 and works by the avant-garde artists of Unit One, of which Nash was a member.

Nash was fascinated by the mystical power of the landscape, moonlight and trees, themes with which he maintained a strong affinity. The exhibition begins with his early illustrative work inspired by Pre-Raphaelite poetry and a fantastical seascape of sand dunes and pyramids. Nature assumes unearthly forms such as the tall elms at his family’s garden in Iver Heath which Nash described as “ … three heads fused in cascades of dense leaves spreading out like the crown of a vast fountain.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingEquivalents for the Megaliths 1935 by Paul Nash. Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Drawn to ancient landmarks, Nash painted the chalky hills of Wittenham Clumps and the prehistoric stones at Avebury, the latter of which inspired his abstract depictions of megaliths.

In wartime, his trees ceased to be places of refuge and tranquillity, as in his early work. With their branches hacked off by artillery fire, his trees became disfigured stalks that scar the landscape. Letters home to his wife, Margaret reveal that in the aftermath of battle, Nash sought comfort in the regeneration of nature, “Nearly all the battered trees have come out and the birds sing all day in spite of shells and shrapnel.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingSpring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917-1918 by Paul Nash.
Imperial War Museum, London, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

During the Second World War, Nash decided to convey war differently and nature became a metaphor for destruction. In his famous work, Totes Meer, an owl surveys the skeletal remains of aircraft wreckage under a watery moon. The artist remarked, “…it is not water or even ice, it is something static and dead. It is metal piled up, wreckage.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingTotes Meer (Dead Sea) 1940-1941 by Paul Nash. Presented by the War Artists Advisory
Committee 1946, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery.

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Paul Nash opens from October 26, 2016 to March 5, 2017 at Tate Britain, London SW1P 4RG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7887 8888

Email: visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Front page image: The Rye Marshes 1932 by Paul Nash. Ferens Art Gallery, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery