Archives for Tate Britain

Alan Kane’s Home for Christmas illuminated at Tate Britain

TATE Britain have commissioned the artist Alan Kane to create their Christmas light display, Home for Christmas. The cheering spectacle was switched on last week, decorating the exterior of the museum.

Alan Kane Tate Britain Home for Christmas Commission
Alan Kane’s Home for Christmas for Tate Britain

Switched on by prominent community figure, Jane Buttigieg, the exhibit on the Victorian façade of the building is part of the gallery’s community Christmas event. Tate’s traditional Christmas tree has been replaced by this light-hearted seasonal commission, featuring LED Santas, reindeer, snowmen and Christmas trees, similar to those decorating houses across Britain. The notion of combining the every-day with high-culture is a theme that frequently features in Kane’s work.

The commission is part of the greater festive period at Tate Britain, including craft activities, festive themed art talks, carol singing and torch-lit viewings of their esteemed Turner collection.

Director of Tate Britain, Alex Farquharson, says, “We’re excited to be giving Tate Britain a whole new face this Christmas … Alan’s ultra-festive response is sure to turn heads – of those both young and old. We look forward to unveiling other surprising festive artist commissions in the years to come.”

by Daisy Sewell

The display shall remain there until the January 6, 2018 and illuminated daily from 05:00am to 00:00am, at Tate Britain, Millbank, Westminster, London SW1P 4RG, UK.

 

Tate Galleries Introduces App for Smartphone Users

TATE Galleries have launched a new app for smartphone users in collaboration with Bloomberg Philanthropies, as part of the Bloomberg Connects programme  which aims to help visitors plan their day more effectively. The Tate App is created by Netherlands-based design agency, Fabrique and global web development company, Potato who have also enhanced the app for iOS devices.

By downloading the free app via Google Play or the Apple App Store, visitors can explore the galleries at their own pace and discover interesting facts about the collections and upcoming events. Far more than just a way finder, the Tate App is designed to not only enable users to locate their position and navigate the galleries with ease but augment an entirely personalised gallery experience. Kerstin Mogull, Managing Director of Tate says, “The Tate app is designed to be simple, useful and fun, putting the whole gallery in the palm of your hand for free.”

600x400The Tate App for Android and iOS devices, Courtesy Tate Galleries

The app’s intuitive and friendly interface welcomes visitors with an initial question, “What do you feel like doing?” and invites them to select from three choices – art, activities, eat or shop. Whether perusing the galleries or drinking a leisurely coffee, visitors can listen to audio clips about their favourite artworks and plan their next move all from their own device.

The Tate App can be used at Tate Modern, Tate Britain, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives when the gallery reopens later this year.

by Miranda Charalambous

Front page image: Tate App for Android and iOS devices, Courtesy Tate Galleries

 

Paul Nash Retrospective Opens At Tate Britain, London

A RETROSPECTIVE of the work of the work of Paul Nash, one of the greatest war artists and landscape painters of the 20th century, opens at Tate Britain in London. Nash played a significant role in the discourse between British art and International Modernism and was a key figure in the development of British surrealism. The exhibition, which takes its title from the artist’s name displays paintings, sculpture and collage, including his collaborative work with British surrealist, Eileen Agar, paintings from the International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936 and works by the avant-garde artists of Unit One, of which Nash was a member.

Nash was fascinated by the mystical power of the landscape, moonlight and trees, themes with which he maintained a strong affinity. The exhibition begins with his early illustrative work inspired by Pre-Raphaelite poetry and a fantastical seascape of sand dunes and pyramids. Nature assumes unearthly forms such as the tall elms at his family’s garden in Iver Heath which Nash described as “ … three heads fused in cascades of dense leaves spreading out like the crown of a vast fountain.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingEquivalents for the Megaliths 1935 by Paul Nash. Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Drawn to ancient landmarks, Nash painted the chalky hills of Wittenham Clumps and the prehistoric stones at Avebury, the latter of which inspired his abstract depictions of megaliths.

In wartime, his trees ceased to be places of refuge and tranquillity, as in his early work. With their branches hacked off by artillery fire, his trees became disfigured stalks that scar the landscape. Letters home to his wife, Margaret reveal that in the aftermath of battle, Nash sought comfort in the regeneration of nature, “Nearly all the battered trees have come out and the birds sing all day in spite of shells and shrapnel.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingSpring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917-1918 by Paul Nash.
Imperial War Museum, London, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

During the Second World War, Nash decided to convey war differently and nature became a metaphor for destruction. In his famous work, Totes Meer, an owl surveys the skeletal remains of aircraft wreckage under a watery moon. The artist remarked, “…it is not water or even ice, it is something static and dead. It is metal piled up, wreckage.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingTotes Meer (Dead Sea) 1940-1941 by Paul Nash. Presented by the War Artists Advisory
Committee 1946, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery.

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Paul Nash opens from October 26, 2016 to March 5, 2017 at Tate Britain, London SW1P 4RG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7887 8888

Email: visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Front page image: The Rye Marshes 1932 by Paul Nash. Ferens Art Gallery, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery