Archives for textiles

Tickets Announced For New Designers 2017, Business Design Centre

NEW DESIGNERS, UK’s most important trade exhibition for emerging talent which open to the public, has announced  that tickets are now available for this year’s show. Now in its 32nd edition, New Designers is one of the most prominent industry shows thanks to its unique blend of design education, consumers and industry all mixed together to celebrate emerging talent. Taking place this June at the Business Design Centre, Islington,  the event is renowned for kick-starting the careers by providing a promotional platform for young creatives.

evgeniia-balashova-pink-broochEvgeniia Balashova pink brooch

Divided into two parts, the exhibition introduces over 3,000 design graduates to the wider public and also gives the visitors the chance to purchase their creations.

benjamin-craven-5-copyBenjamin Craven 5

The first three days will present the latest talent in textiles and fashion, costume design, jewellery and metalwork, ceramics and glass and contemporary design crafts. The following days will feature exhibitors in the disciplines of furniture, product and industrial design, spatial design and interiors, graphic design, illustration, animation, motion and digital arts.

stephanie-holt-ufo-bladedStephanie Holt UFO Bladed, Reniform, Hopper RINGS

As New Designers’ organisers strive to show completely new content each year, and also includes a One Year On retrospective presenting the progress of  exhibitors from previous years.

by Magda McCrimmon

New Designers  is on from June 28 until July 8, 2017

Tickets are now available  here

100% Egyptian Cotton Project Featured at International Fashion Showcase

DURING LFW AW17, a 100% Egyptian Cotton project showed for the second time at the International Fashion Showcase, in Somerset House, exhibiting the work of six of Egypt’s most promising emerging designers: Maram Paris – womenswear; Marsuma by Nour Omar – textiles painting; Norine Farah – womenswear; Okhtein – handbags; Reem Jano – jewellery and Sabry Marouf handbags and jewellery.

egyptian-cotton-1
The 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The artists were commissioned to produce pieces which reflected their interpretation of Egyptian cotton as a theme but were otherwise granted complete creative freedom. The stunning results encompassed references to the life cycle of the cotton plant, to the harvesting of the delicate fibre through to the manufacturing of the incredibly versatile textile into finished products. The two ready-to-wear designers for example, embellished classic white cotton shirts with intricate floral detail, alluding to the colourful garments worn by the young women who work in the cotton fields.

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Garments on show at the 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The exhibition was curated by Susan Sabet, founder and editor-in-chief of Pashion magazine, and was endorsed by the British Council Egypt and the Commercial International Bank Egypt (CIB). Sahara by Shahira Fawzy provided the cotton utilised throughout the display while the installation itself – a dreamy North African oasis under a vibrant dusk sky – was styled by Egyptian interior design company Living In.

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100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

The exhibit proved one of the most popular at the event – the theme of which was this year Local/Glocal – which  is organised by the British Council and the British Fashion Council.

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Bags at 100% Egyptian Cotton at International Fashion Showcase 2017

“We are pleased and proud to have sponsored 100% Egyptian Cotton,” said CIB’s CEO of retail banking Ahmed Issa. “The exhibit represents not only the deep and diverse talent of the six young designers and the team that created the magnificent installation, but the vast talent throughout Egypt.”

by Hannah Bergin

Loren Nicole announces latest collection

HANDMADE jewellery designer Loren Nicole has launched her newest collection. Using ancient techniques and no electricity, Loren Nicole’s handmade jewellery collection celebrates ethnographic cultures from across the world and the craftsmanship of ancient goldsmiths.

collage-6Beach hut collection

Each piece of jewellery is designed to highlight the beautiful colour of high karat yellow gold and is produced from gold grain to final finish by Loren’s hand.

rodarte
Credit: Rodarte catwalk

Her collections are inspired by a different ancient civilisation’s techniques and aesthetic element, with her first entitled Hellenes highlighting the Etruscan style. Loren’s latest jewellery collection Babylon is inspired by the ancient Mesopotamia temple Ziggurat.

floralsHellenes collection

Loren began her career in archaeology and then specialised her skills at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York through a position as a textile conservator.

by Alice Fiancet

Loren Nicole’s collections are available here

 

Lubaina Himid Turns the Tide at Modern Art Oxford

THE vibrant paintings of Tanzanian-born, British-based artist  Lubaina Himid shimmer with Zanzibar’s piquant colours but within them, turbulent waters forecast change, hope and uncertainty. Invisible Strategies, the first survey exhibition of Himid’s work is on show at the contemporary art space, Modern Art Oxford. The display comprises early work from the 1980s to the present day, including pieces that have not been exhibited before.

 Lubaina Himid, Modern Art Oxford, paintingLubaina Himid, Metal / Paper, Beach House, 1995. Courtesy the artist & Hollybush Gardens

Highlighting a more truthful version of historical events, Himid appeals to her audience through her lively canvases, textiles, cutouts, prints and collages. The artist explains, “I am not a painter in the strictest sense … I am a political strategist who uses a visual language to encourage conversation, argument, change.”

Throughout her work, strange interiors and puzzling scenarios suggest transition or escape, whilst the myriad of over-painted plates and jugs provide a poignant reminder to past and indeed, present day slavery.

 Lubaina Himid, Modern Art Oxford, paintingLubaina Himid, Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service (detail), 2007.
Courtesy the artist and Hollybush Gardens, Photograph: Andy Keate

 In her work, the legacy of colonial trade, diaspora and conflict become embodied with her personal experiences. The painting series Le Rodeur, named after a nineteenth century slave ship recalls a time of great sadness and change following her father’s death from malaria in the mid-1950s. Travelling with her mother at just four months old, Himid left the shores of Zanzibar for the bustle and bright lights of Blackpool, UK.

 Lubaina Himid, Modern Art Oxford, paintingLubaina Himid, Le Rodeur: (The Lock), 2016. Courtesy the artist and Hollybush Gardens

The distant waves that corner Himid’s transitory spaces allude to peril, migration and her empathy with the power of the elements, “I have never been able to swim properly and am very frightened of the sea and of drowning,” says Himid.

Lubaina Himid is a Professor of Contemporary Art at the University of Central Lancashire. Since her early involvement with the Black Arts Movement of the 1980s, she has campaigned for the recognition of black artists through exhibitions, projects, conferences including research documentaries for Tate Liverpool.

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Lubaina Himid: Invisible Strategies runs from 21 January to 30 April 2017 at Modern Art Oxford, 30 Pembroke Street, Oxford, OX1 1BP.

Telephone: +44 (0)1865 722733

Email: info@modernartoxford.org.uk

Front page image: Lubaina Himid, Le Rodeur: Exchange, 2016. Courtesy the artist & Hollybush Gardens

 

 

 

 

Longstaff Longstaff Presents Loungewear for Valentine’s Day

LUXURY brand Longstaff Longstaff offers a range of silk loungewear for Valentine’s Day. The collection includes silk robes, tunics, pyjamas and camisoles which are available in four different styles with each one first being designed on paper before being digitally prepared for printing on silk.

 

collage-2From left to right: Meadow pyjama blouse and shorts; Circles Pyjama blouse and trousers;
Lotus robe and Indigo trousers

Inspiration for the collection comes from founder Sophie Barnard’s Russian background. These roots, inherited through her mother, led her to develop a passion for fresh vibrant colours and decorative patterns such as those used by Russian illustrator Ivan Bilibin and the costume designs of Leon Bakst. Also as a child Sophie loved dressing up and her dressing-up box was full of bearskin hats, sarafans and a beautiful kokoshnik, a traditional Russian head-dress, which also inform and influence her designs.

collageFrom left to right: Peppermint trousers, Lotus robe, Silver shorts

 

The brand, named after Sophie’s paternal grandmother, who was one of seven sisters all with the middle and surname Longstaff, is designed, sourced and manufactured in Britain. Sophie has always been captivated and inspired by the stories of elegant parties, wild adventures and handsome suitors from her grandmother and pays homage to the British eccentricity from her father’s heritage through her designs.

by Alice Fiancet

The Longstaff Longstaff collection can be found here.

The National Gallery London Shows Paintings by Juan Bautista Maíno

A MAGNIFICENT display of paintings by the talented renaissance artist, Fray Juan Bautista Maíno will be on show at the National Gallery in London next week. The exhibition, Maíno’s Adorations: Heaven on Earth will display, “The Adoration of the Shepherds and The Adoration of the Kings from the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid, two paintings never to have been shown in Britain before.

These highly significant paintings display are some of the earliest examples of Spanish painting influenced by the work of Caravaggio. Maíno’s Adorations: Heaven on Earth coincides with the National Gallery’s major exhibition, Beyond Caravaggio which opens next month.

Fray Juan Bautista Maíno, painting, art Fray Juan Bautista Maíno, The Adoration of the Kings, 1612 – 1614, oil on canvas, 315 x 174.5 cm, Museo Nacional del Prado © Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

Maíno, the son of a silk merchant was born in the Spanish town of Pastrana, a centre for silk-weaving. The opulent silks and fine gold brocades in Maíno’s paintings display his familiarity and understanding of the textiles traded at the time. The realistic quality attributed to the artist’s work was achieved by chiaroscuro, an expert rendering of light and shade pioneered by Caravaggio. The National Gallery director, Dr Gabriele Finaldi said, “Maíno’s Adorations were painted over four hundred years ago but the brightness of the palette, the variety of people represented and the combination of naturalism and artificiality, give the paintings a surprisingly modern look. Maíno, a friend of Velázquez deserves to be much better known.”

Fray Juan Bautista Maíno, painting, artFray Juan Bautista Maíno, The Adoration of the Shepherds, 1612 – 1614, oil on canvas,
314.4 x 174.4 cm.Museo Nacional del Prado  © Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

by Miranda Charalambous

Maíno’s Adorations: Heaven on Earth opens from September 28, 2016 to 29 January 2017 at the National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

Email: information@ng-london.org.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7747 2885

Front page image: Fray Juan Bautista Maíno, The Adoration of the Kings, 1612 – 1614, oil on canvas, 315 x 174.5 cm, Museo Nacional del Prado © Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

Kitty Joseph Launches AW16 Colour Fields Rainbow Collection

FASHION designer Kitty Joseph has launched her AW 16 Colour Fields Rainbow Fashion collection. The range is inspired by prints, gradients and Josef Albers’ handbook Interaction of Color. The handbook influenced and inspired Joseph to explore the relationship of two colours in isolation. The collection uses a simple colour palette but ventures into different patterns and textures, resulting in a thrilling explosion of colour. The collection also sees Joseph’s first exploration into knitwear.

Kitty Joseph AW 16 Colour Fields Rainbow Fashion Collection Copyright © 2016 Kitty JosephAW 16 Collection Copyright ©2016 Kitty Joseph

 

Kitty Joseph AW 16 Colour Fields Rainbow Fashion Collection Copyright © 2016 Kitty JosephAW 16 Collection Copyright © 2016 Kitty Joseph

Joseph’s career first began at the Royal College of Art where she graduated with an MA in Textile Design. She gained instant industry recognition in 2011 after unexpectedly selling her entire graduate collection. Joseph has since collaborated on an array of projects with brands and celebrities ranging from Absolut Vodka to Lady Gaga.

Kitty Joseph AW 16 Colour Fields Rainbow Fashion Collection Copyright © 2016 Kitty Joseph
AW 16 Collection Copyright © 2016 Kitty Joseph

Always a lover of colour, painting and illustration, the foundation of the brand is built upon colour exploration and textile innovation, which the new collection epitomises. Additionally, a wider collection of complementary pieces will be available later in the year.

Kitty Joseph AW 16 Colour Fields Rainbow Fashion Collection Copyright © 2016 Kitty JosephAW 16 Collection Copyright ©2016 Kitty Joseph

by Rebecca Acres

London Design Fair Features Contemporary Scottish Craft

THE London Design Fair  will take place at the Truman Brewery in East London later this year. The spectacular four-day industry event, which is hosted in collaboration with Tent London and Super Brands London, showcases the work of independent designers, established brands and galleries. In addition, new designers and global brands will be launched in the UK through 15 international country pavilions represented by Portugal, Switzerland, Norway, India and China.

Lara Scobie, Scotland Craft and DesignLara Scobie, Scotland Craft and Design. Photograph: London Design Fair

Lara Scobie, an award-winning ceramist will be exhibiting new work at the Scotland Design and Craft pavilion. Her elegantly tapered vessels with undulating motifs reflect the subtlety of traditional weaving techniques through contemporary hand-drawn designs.

From the Highlands of Scotland, Catherine MacGruer creates fabulous Merino wool textiles in vibrant, eye-catching designs influenced by travels abroad. Her geometric patterns evolve from collaged shapes which are digitally knitted into cushions, blankets and scarves.

Juli Bolaños-Durman, Scotland Craft and Design. Photgraph © London Design FairJuli Bolaños-Durman, Scotland Craft and Design. Photograph: London Design Fair

Stormy Scottish weather, Japanese wabi-sabi and light on the Moray Firth inspire Juli Bolaños-Durman, a Latin-American designer based in Scotland. Her latest Made-Up Museum of Artefacts collection combines engraved blown glass with found materials. By creating “something beautiful from things that people are about to discard”, she explores the challenges that their unwanted items present.

Yellow Broom, Scotland Craft and Design. Photograph London Design FairYellow Broom, Scotland Craft and Design. Photograph: London Design Fair

by Miranda Charalambous

The London Design Fair opens September 22 – 25, 2016 at the
Old Truman Brewery, 26 Hanbury Street, London E1 6QR.
Thu 10am – 7pm, Fri – Sat 10am – 8pm, Sun 11am – 6pm

Front page image: Juli Bolaños-Durman, Scotland Craft and Design. Photograph: London Design Fair

 

English Medieval Embroidery Show to Open in London

THE Victoria and Albert Museum presents a rare opportunity to see outstanding examples of English needlework from the 11th and 16th centuries in Opus Anglicanum, Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery. A magnificent display of secular and ecclesiastical garments, the exhibition reveals the richness and complexity of these unique textiles and provides a fascinating insight into the skill and craftsmanship of their makers.

Paris, musée de Cluny - musée national du Moyen Âge. CL20367a;CL20367b.Part of a horse trapper probably made for Edward III’s Court (detail) 1330-40. Photograp © RMN –
Grand Palais (Musée de Cluny – Musée National du Moyen Âge) / Frank Raux

One of the most exciting treasures on view is a fragment from Thomas Becket’s cope, a relic which exemplifies the astonishing survival of these finely worked pieces. Apart from embroidery, a display of sculpture, metalwork, manuscripts and painting also bring context to the period.

83-1864 The Syon Cope; embroidered in coloured silks & silver-gilt thread with the Figures of Christ, The Virgin Mary & The Apostles; detail; English (Opus Anglitareum); Early 14th century.The Syon Cope (detail) 1310-1320. Photo © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

by Miranda Charalambous

Opus Anglicanum, Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery is curated by Clare Browne, Glyn Davies and consultant curator Prof MA Michael and opens October 1 and runs until  February 5, 2017 at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

ESMOD Berlin MA Fashion Graduates Debut their Collections

ESMOD Berlin International University of Art for Fashion MA programme Sustainability in Fashion is an unique course which allows students to develop practical as well as analytical skills in sustainable fashion design with the aim of setting up feasible businesses. The course revolves around the notions of partnership and collaboration which are crucial to building a paradigm of interdisciplinary exchange and, therefore, a common platform for communication.

The course at ESMOD promotes holistic design practice in which the creative process focuses on economical, ethical, social and cultural awareness and sustainability while not compromising on beautiful aesthetics.

Lena and Nir - the weddingThe Plant Stories project by Renana Krebs for ESMOD Berlin International
University of Art for Fashion MA programme

ahmed picture 2 The Samrdd project by Hira Ahmed for the ESMOD Fashion MA programme.

The program is based on four main parts – sustainable design strategies, sustainable textiles and production, sustainable marketing and business and design anthropology – with each student being supported by a high-profile business partner.

While studying on the MA,  the students choose their own specific focus which allows them to place their discipline and interest within a broader aspect of study and therefore enrich their own ideas and design practice.

We have selected five designers of the 17 recent graduates from the ESMOD MA course to look at their work a little more deeply.

alice beyer schuchAlice Beyer-Schuch’s Further textile rebirth project for ESMOD

Israeli-born Renana Krebs comes from a family of botanists which has hugely influenced her Plant Stories project which she developed in partnership with Hessnatur, Smartfibre AG, Spinnerei Feldkich, Comazo GMbH. Inspired by  classical ballet and driven by sporty elegance, she designed a 15-piece collection with flowing silhouettes that offer comfort and unrestricted movement while still remaining elegant.

Krebs’s main focus in this project was exploring the interactions between man and nature and the possibility of developing new materials that benefit both the environment and humankind. The result of this was a development of a new yarn combination from the micro-organisms of algae with micro-modal elderweiss and a fabric that releases moisture into the body of the wearer.

Remo Polack looked at sustainable design strategies in his project Remoform developed in partnership with Dutch aWEARness, Lauffenmuhle and Persu at Work. His was interested in garments that were a part of mass production and so he focused on uniforms – a garment which is produced in large quantities and, more often that not, discarded once it is worn out.

Inspired by the Cradle to Cradle circular business-model, Polack worked towards a sustainable standard that sees all uniforms produced from one material which would allow them to be recycled and, hence, adding to them infinite value and saving on the natural resources necessary to produce new garments.

remo pollack Remoform by Remo Polack for ESMOD Berlin International University of Art for Fashion MA programme.

Another student pursuing the notion of sustainability in design is Hira Ahmed, whose project Samrdd aims at close collaborations with traditional artisans. Hailing from Pakistan, Ahmed has embarked on a journey reconnecting her with her roots and developing a longing for cultivating the traditional block-printing textiles technique practices by inhabitants of remote areas of Pakistan.

Due to their poverty and the extremely challenging conditions these people live in, this technique is on a verge of extinction. Ahmed works exclusively with the artisans sourcing all of her fabrics from them with the aim of  bringing better income and general life – enhancing investment to the are while practising fair trade and preserving the unique craft of hand-dying of silks and cottons.

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A look from Hira Ahmed’s Samrdd project for the ESMOD Ma Programme

Similar sentiments are reflected in Isabelle Regier’s project Ive – which focuses on a sustainable leather concept. Supported by companies Wet Green, YKK and Trippen, Reiger has designed a collection of organic leather bags that build on local resources, recyclability and ethical business practices. Her aim is to create an entirely transparent production chain from the designer all the way to the user, deploying the notions of responsible production and conscious consumption.

Regier used olive leaves to tan the leather so she could create goods that are fully biodegradable. So the bags fully recyclable as well as responsibly produced. The collection has also been created around the concept of timelessness and therefore aims at maximising the longevity of the items despite fashion trends and seasons.

isabelle reigerA bag in the Ive project by Isabelle Regier for ESMOD Berlin MA programme

Alice Beyer Schuch explored the possibilities of sustainable textiles and production in her project Further – textile rebirth catalyst. Tasked with establishing a comprehensive business, Schuch worked on creating a new type of textile but also devising a promotional campaign to present the idea to the public and to attempt to instigate wide-reaching change in thinking by the public.

The fabric she worked on is based on a technology which recycles old textiles. The final of this is a 100 per cent cellulosic material which is completely recyclable. The general idea is to create an event that bring brands and designers together so that they can work together eventually producing the end product to the customer.

Sustainability in Fashion MA at ESMOD is a unique course that tackles issues of paramount importance to the modernday world – resource renewability, waste, mindless consumption. It furthermore challenges the notion that responsible and organic fashion comes second style-wise to high-end luxurious design.

Thanks to the comprehensive selection of course units that complement each other the course aims to effectively educate a new generation of designers and business professionals who may be instrumental in a chance of turning around the industry.

by Magda Pirowska

For more details about the course, please visit here:

ESMOD Berlin International University of Art for Fashion MA programme Sustainability in Fashion 

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