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Joy of Living Charity Auction For Maggie’s Centres Opens

THIS SEPTEMBER, Charity Project Joy of Living returns to One Poultry, City of London. Uniting over 100 designers, architects and artists, whose work is to be sold to raise funds for Maggie’s Centres. The charity helps people to cope with the impact of a cancer diagnosis, to continue to live in hope and with determination and to find a life beyond cancer.

The third event for the charity, held by design author and long-time supporter of Maggie’s, Max Fraser hopes to raise more than £80,000 for the charity, stating “after a very personal, emotional journey as I supported my mother through her six-year battle with cancer, I vowed to contribute in some way to mankind’s fight against this disease”.

m4Anonymous for Maggie’s Centres, Joy of Living project

Emerging and established designers have been asked to create and donate one-off pieces, expressing the joy of living. Using only three pieces of differently coloured paper supplied by G.F Smith from their Colourplan range.

A number of talented, creative individuals have donated their artworks including designers: Jasper Morrison, Fredrikson Stallard, Barber & Osgerby, Tom Dixon, Ross Lovegrove, Eley Kishimoto and Ilse Crawford, works by architects: John Pawson, Ivan Harbour and Steven Holl, jewellery designers: Hannah Martin and Jade Jagger and pieces from artists Daniel Eatock, Rolf Sachs and Jake and Dinos Chapman.

m2Anonymous for Maggie’s Centres, Joy of Living project

Each of the designers were provided with three A4 coloured sheets, randomly selected from 12 colours. The artists can manipulate the paper in any way they choose and are to write a short description about what inspired them. The signed works will be displayed anonymously, with the creator unrevealed until after purchase. The artwork should invoke an emotional response within the buyer, regardless of the name behind it. The inspiration for this design challenge and the Joy of Living project itself came from a thought shared by Maggie Keswick, charity founder “above all what matters is not to lose the joy of living in the fear of dying”

Speaking about the event, held at the Grade II, postmodern, listed building One Poultry, designed by James Stirling. Laura Lee, Chief Executive at Maggie’s explained “the design of our buildings, landscape and interiors is integral to offering the best possible support to people with cancer and their family and friends”. The charity has opened 21 centres in 21 years, across the UK with the support of Max Fraser and the Joy of Living project. Lee further stating, “good design is core to our belief in the best psychological support and partnering with the design industry means we can constantly learn what the best design looks like”

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Anonymous for Maggie’s Centres, Joy of Living project

For this year’s event Max Fraser has collaborated with friend, Aynsley Munsie and Amy Bicknell, project co-ordinator, along with various other generous supporters. All proceeds from the artworks sale will go to Maggie’s Centres Charity.

by Pierra George-Robertson

Front Page Image: Joy of Living project for Maggie’s Centres, Anonymous

Joy of Living will be exhibited at One Poultry from September 5-10, from 10am – 7pm

All artwork is available to view and bid at Maggie’s Centres

View on location at One Poultry from September 5

Donate to Maggie’s Centres.

Van Eyck Exhibition Opens at National Gallery, London

A NEW show of the work of Van Eyck is opening at the National Gallery in London.  This autumn, his oil painting the Arnolfini portrait, is set to be exhibited at the National Gallery, providing a unique opportunity to view Pre-Raphaelite paintings next to the work that inspired them. The National Gallery received the Arnolfini portrait in 1842 and immediately captivated the Victorian audience. The Netherlandish/Flemish Van Eyck is one of the most significant representatives of Northern Renaissance art.

'Portrait of Giovanni(?) Arnolfini and his Wife' or 'The Arnolfini Portrait'Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and his Wife 1434 by Jan Van Eyck, Courtesy of The National Gallery London

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was made up of a group of young artists who sparked a revolution in British art. The Convex mirror in the Arnolfini painting is a key motif and it led the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood to explore the themes of distortion, doubling, and reflection. The painting has left an imprint on the Pre-Raphaelites’ work, spreading its motifs like the mirror device, seen in Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s Lucrezia Borgia and a pair of pointed slippers seen in Holman Hunt’s The Lady of Shalott.

mirror-final-versionConvex Mirror owned by Gabriel Dante Rossetti, Courtesy of Kelmscott Manor

The convex mirror has been an important source of inspiration for many generations of artists and so Van Eyck’s influence lives on.

by Marco Pretara

The exhibition, Reflections: Van Eyck and the Pre-Raphaelite’s is on from October 2, 2017 until April 2, 2018 at the National Gallery, London WC2N 5DN
Tel: 020 7747 2885
Email: information@ng-london.org.uk

Front Page Image: Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and his Wife 1434 by Jan Van Eyck, Courtesy of The National Gallery London

Longstaff Longstaff Presents Loungewear for Valentine’s Day

LUXURY brand Longstaff Longstaff offers a range of silk loungewear for Valentine’s Day. The collection includes silk robes, tunics, pyjamas and camisoles which are available in four different styles with each one first being designed on paper before being digitally prepared for printing on silk.

 

collage-2From left to right: Meadow pyjama blouse and shorts; Circles Pyjama blouse and trousers;
Lotus robe and Indigo trousers

Inspiration for the collection comes from founder Sophie Barnard’s Russian background. These roots, inherited through her mother, led her to develop a passion for fresh vibrant colours and decorative patterns such as those used by Russian illustrator Ivan Bilibin and the costume designs of Leon Bakst. Also as a child Sophie loved dressing up and her dressing-up box was full of bearskin hats, sarafans and a beautiful kokoshnik, a traditional Russian head-dress, which also inform and influence her designs.

collageFrom left to right: Peppermint trousers, Lotus robe, Silver shorts

 

The brand, named after Sophie’s paternal grandmother, who was one of seven sisters all with the middle and surname Longstaff, is designed, sourced and manufactured in Britain. Sophie has always been captivated and inspired by the stories of elegant parties, wild adventures and handsome suitors from her grandmother and pays homage to the British eccentricity from her father’s heritage through her designs.

by Alice Fiancet

The Longstaff Longstaff collection can be found here.

Jasper Conran Launches Eyewear Collection

BRITISH fashion designer Jasper Conran has launched a new collection of eyewear for SS17. The range includes 24 designs encompassing both men’s and women’s style. The collection is set to include a range of colours as well as the classic tortoiseshell style for both men and women.

screen-shot-2017-01-12-at-18-55-54Jasper Conran men’s eyewear for SS17

Conran has been designing since 1978 when he launched his first womenswear collection in New York. Since beginning his career, Conran has diversified from womenswear into all areas of fashion as well as interior design and the performing arts.

screen-shot-2017-01-12-at-18-56-01Jasper Conran women’s eyewear

In 2008, Conran was awarded an OBE for his services to retail and has had his collections stocked in Debenhams and Boots for many years.

by Alice Fiancet

Maviada Jewellery Opens Online Store

LONDON-based, Turkish-born, and Mediterranean-inspired, Maviada Jewellery has launched an e-commerce shop, allowing its customers to purchase the brand’s characteristically refined, highly sophisticated pieces online for the very first time.

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Antibes Single Earrings. Photograph: Maviada

The collection comprises earrings, bracelets, necklaces and pendants, each made from 18ct gold vermeil or 18ct solid gold, in rose, yellow and white hues. The classic designs feature a number of ethically sourced gemstones such as aquamarine, purple amethyst and pink tourmaline which add a subtle touch of the exotic, which indeed inspired and remains at the very heart of the brand’s character and aesthetic.

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Bodrum Bracelet Photograph: Maviada

Maviada was founded in 2009 by Istanbul-born Eda Elbirlik, who grew up in the USA but remained profoundly attached to and infinitely inspired by her Turkish heritage. “My inspiration for a Maviada collection comes from many sources, but mainly, my summer holidays on the Aegean coast in Turkey. The blue green turquoise sea waters of the Mediterranean were, and continue to be, a calming influence on me and help me balance my life accordingly. From the soothing colours of the sea, the silver green hues of the olive trees, the bright, multi-coloured glow of the ceramic tiles — they all add to and influence my design concepts for each collection,” she says.

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Antibes Cascade Earrings. Photograph: Maviada

by Hannah Bergin

The collection is available from the Maviada website.
Prices start at £155 with limited edition 18ct pieces priced at £3,025.

Yull Releases Latest Footwear Collection for SS17

UP-beat, fun-loving, youthful and colourful, British footwear brand Yull has released its latest shoe collection for SS17. The collection features eye-catching candy colours and vibrant tropical prints refresh classic designs such as the brogue, court shoe and Mary-Jane heel, which nod towards the charming baby-doll style of the 60s. Yull was launched in 2011, by Sarah Watkinson-Yull while she was still a student, and who refused to believe that it was not possible to produce high-heeled shoes in the UK.

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Yull SS17. Photograph: Yull

Resolute, ever confident in her creative vision, and keen to not develop the repute of the British fashion industry, but to promote the country’s sartorial manufacturing facilities, Sarah’s brand won funding from the Prince’s Trust in May 2011.

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Yull SS17. Photograph: Yull

Her playful Made in Britain shoes become available on the market the following year. The brand has continued to go from strength to strength, winning a variety of grants from bodies such as European Development Fund in 2012, Lloyd’s Enterprise Award in 2013, which have facilitated the label’s expansion across the USA and Asia. Yull’s shoes mind, still proudly bear as they will always, their Made in Britain mark.

by Hannah Bergin

Yull shoes are available online here

 

Paul Nash Retrospective Opens At Tate Britain, London

A RETROSPECTIVE of the work of the work of Paul Nash, one of the greatest war artists and landscape painters of the 20th century, opens at Tate Britain in London. Nash played a significant role in the discourse between British art and International Modernism and was a key figure in the development of British surrealism. The exhibition, which takes its title from the artist’s name displays paintings, sculpture and collage, including his collaborative work with British surrealist, Eileen Agar, paintings from the International Surrealist Exhibition of 1936 and works by the avant-garde artists of Unit One, of which Nash was a member.

Nash was fascinated by the mystical power of the landscape, moonlight and trees, themes with which he maintained a strong affinity. The exhibition begins with his early illustrative work inspired by Pre-Raphaelite poetry and a fantastical seascape of sand dunes and pyramids. Nature assumes unearthly forms such as the tall elms at his family’s garden in Iver Heath which Nash described as “ … three heads fused in cascades of dense leaves spreading out like the crown of a vast fountain.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingEquivalents for the Megaliths 1935 by Paul Nash. Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Drawn to ancient landmarks, Nash painted the chalky hills of Wittenham Clumps and the prehistoric stones at Avebury, the latter of which inspired his abstract depictions of megaliths.

In wartime, his trees ceased to be places of refuge and tranquillity, as in his early work. With their branches hacked off by artillery fire, his trees became disfigured stalks that scar the landscape. Letters home to his wife, Margaret reveal that in the aftermath of battle, Nash sought comfort in the regeneration of nature, “Nearly all the battered trees have come out and the birds sing all day in spite of shells and shrapnel.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingSpring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood, 1917-1918 by Paul Nash.
Imperial War Museum, London, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

During the Second World War, Nash decided to convey war differently and nature became a metaphor for destruction. In his famous work, Totes Meer, an owl surveys the skeletal remains of aircraft wreckage under a watery moon. The artist remarked, “…it is not water or even ice, it is something static and dead. It is metal piled up, wreckage.”

Paul Nash, Tate Gallery, art, paintingTotes Meer (Dead Sea) 1940-1941 by Paul Nash. Presented by the War Artists Advisory
Committee 1946, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery.

by Miranda Charalambous

The exhibition, Paul Nash opens from October 26, 2016 to March 5, 2017 at Tate Britain, London SW1P 4RG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7887 8888

Email: visiting.britain@tate.org.uk

Front page image: The Rye Marshes 1932 by Paul Nash. Ferens Art Gallery, Courtesy of the Tate Gallery

Fredrich Nagler: Wunderkammer to Display at Pallant House Gallery

A COLLECTION of small sculptures by the self-taught Jewish artist Friedrich Nagler will go on display at Pallant House Gallery’s De’Longhi Print Room next month. The showcase aims to engage audiences with outsider art in order to bring more awareness to work by self-taught artists.

Friedrich Nagler, Box of heads made from cast resin and bax of heads made from bone, © Pallant House GalleryFredrich Nagler, Box of heads made from cast resin and box of heads made from bone © Pallant House Gallery

Inspired by the horrors of the Holocaust, the exhibition focuses on a series of small-scale sculptural heads which were carved, cast and assembled from materials such as bone, metal, ivory, plastic and non-traditional materials such as bread. It will be the first time that these works will be displayed in a public gallery. The arrangement will create the impression of a cabinet of curiosities (or Wunderkammer in German).

 

Friedrich Nagler, Five heads made from resin, © Pallant House GalleryFredrich Nagler, Five heads made from resin © Pallant House Gallery

 

Friedrich Nagler, Heads made from bread, © Pallant House GalleryFredrich Naglar, Heads made from bread © Pallant House Gallery

 

Friedrich Nagler, Three heads made from ivory, © Pallant House GalleryFredrich Nagler, Three heads made from ivory, © Pallant House Gallery

Born in Vienna in 1920, Nagler fled from Nazi-occupied Austria to come to the UK in 1939. He began to produce his unique work in his Hampshire home in 1945 where he used the by-products and off-cuts from various workplaces. By the early 1960s, Nagler began using clay, wrought-iron, ivory and even animal bones to create sculptures of animals, crucifixes and stylised faces. Towards the end of Nagler’s life, he created larger but simpler abstract constructions of masks and animals from polystyrene, plastic tubes and containers.

Nagler refused to sell his work or have it exhibited during his lifetime. However since his death in 2009, his work has been shown in small shows. The show at Pallant House Gallery is the biggest exhibition of his work to date.

by Rebecca Acres

Friedrich Nagler: Wunderkammer opens June  30 and runs until October 16, 2016 at Pallant House Gallery 9 North Pallant, Chichester West Sussex
Tel: 01243 774557